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Article

Development of a Codebook of Online Anti-Vaccination Rhetoric to Manage COVID-19 Vaccine Misinformation

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Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab (PERIL), American University, Washington, DC 20016, USA
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Program of Justice, Law, and Criminology, School of Public Affairs, American University, Washington, DC 20016, USA
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Emergency Preparedness Research Evaluation & Practice (EPREP) Program, Division of Policy Translation & Leadership Development, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Jigsaw, Google LLC, New York, NY 10011, USA
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Emergency Preparedness Research Evaluation & Practice (EPREP) Program, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jianyong Wu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7556; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147556
Received: 26 May 2021 / Revised: 28 June 2021 / Accepted: 11 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Collection Outbreak of a Novel Coronavirus: A Global Health Threat)
Vaccine hesitancy (delay in obtaining a vaccine, despite availability) represents a significant hurdle to managing the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccine hesitancy is in part related to the prevalence of anti-vaccine misinformation and disinformation, which are spread through social media and user-generated content platforms. This study uses qualitative coding methodology to identify salient narratives and rhetorical styles common to anti-vaccine and COVID-denialist media. It organizes these narratives and rhetorics according to theme, imagined antagonist, and frequency. Most frequent were narratives centered on “corrupt elites” and rhetorics appealing to the vulnerability of children. The identification of these narratives and rhetorics may assist in developing effective public health messaging campaigns, since narrative and emotion have demonstrated persuasive effectiveness in other public health communication settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; anti-vax; public health communication; attitudinal inoculation; misinformation; disinformation COVID-19; vaccine hesitancy; anti-vax; public health communication; attitudinal inoculation; misinformation; disinformation
MDPI and ACS Style

Hughes, B.; Miller-Idriss, C.; Piltch-Loeb, R.; Goldberg, B.; White, K.; Criezis, M.; Savoia, E. Development of a Codebook of Online Anti-Vaccination Rhetoric to Manage COVID-19 Vaccine Misinformation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7556. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147556

AMA Style

Hughes B, Miller-Idriss C, Piltch-Loeb R, Goldberg B, White K, Criezis M, Savoia E. Development of a Codebook of Online Anti-Vaccination Rhetoric to Manage COVID-19 Vaccine Misinformation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7556. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147556

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hughes, Brian, Cynthia Miller-Idriss, Rachael Piltch-Loeb, Beth Goldberg, Kesa White, Meili Criezis, and Elena Savoia. 2021. "Development of a Codebook of Online Anti-Vaccination Rhetoric to Manage COVID-19 Vaccine Misinformation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7556. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147556

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