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Article

Psychological Factors Affecting Risk Perception of COVID-19: Evidence from Peru and China

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Department of Psychology, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco, Cusco 08002, Peru
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Department of Social Psychology, Nankai University, Tianjin 300350, China
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School of Public Administration, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, China
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Instituto de Investigación Ambiente Comportamiento y Sociedad, Cusco 08002, Peru
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Department of Pharmacy, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco, Cusco 08002, Peru
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Liliana Cori, Fabrizio Bianchi, Ennio Cadum and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126513
Received: 23 April 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 13 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research about Risk Perception in the Environmental Health Domain)
COVID-19 has spread around the world, causing a global pandemic, and to date is impacting in various ways in both developed and developing countries. We know that the spread of this virus is through people’s behavior despite the perceived risks. Risk perception plays an important role in decision-making to prevent infection. Using data from the online survey of participants in Peru and China (N = 1594), data were collected between 8 July 31 and August 2020. We found that levels of risk perception are relatively moderate, but higher in Peru compared to China. In both countries, anxiety, threat perception, self-confidence, and sex were found to be significant predictors of risk perception; however, trust in the information received by government and experts was significant only in Peru, whereas self-confidence had a significant negative effect only for China. Risk communication should be implemented through information programs aimed at reducing anxiety and improving self-confidence, taking into consideration gender differences. In addition, the information generated by the government should be based on empirical sources. Finally, the implications for effective risk communication and its impacts on the health field are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVD-19; risk perception; anxiety; threat; confidence COVD-19; risk perception; anxiety; threat; confidence
MDPI and ACS Style

Monge-Rodríguez, F.S.; Jiang, H.; Zhang, L.; Alvarado-Yepez, A.; Cardona-Rivero, A.; Huaman-Chulluncuy, E.; Torres-Mejía, A. Psychological Factors Affecting Risk Perception of COVID-19: Evidence from Peru and China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6513. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126513

AMA Style

Monge-Rodríguez FS, Jiang H, Zhang L, Alvarado-Yepez A, Cardona-Rivero A, Huaman-Chulluncuy E, Torres-Mejía A. Psychological Factors Affecting Risk Perception of COVID-19: Evidence from Peru and China. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6513. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126513

Chicago/Turabian Style

Monge-Rodríguez, Fredy S., He Jiang, Liwei Zhang, Andy Alvarado-Yepez, Anahí Cardona-Rivero, Enma Huaman-Chulluncuy, and Analy Torres-Mejía. 2021. "Psychological Factors Affecting Risk Perception of COVID-19: Evidence from Peru and China" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6513. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126513

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