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Prenatal Exposure to Di-Ethyl Phthalate (DEP) Is Related to Increasing Neonatal IgE Levels and the Altering of the Immune Polarization of Helper-T Cells
 
 
Article

Association of Mercury Exposure and Maternal Sociodemographics on Birth Outcomes of Indigenous and Tribal Women in Suriname

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Medical Mission Primary Health Care Suriname, Paramaribo, Suriname
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Faculty of Medical Sciences, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Paramaribo, Suriname
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Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
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Foundation for Perinatal Interventions and Research in Suriname (Perisur), Paramaribo, Suriname
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Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
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Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kinga Polanska and Marty Kanarek
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6370; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126370
Received: 25 April 2021 / Revised: 25 May 2021 / Accepted: 9 June 2021 / Published: 12 June 2021
Information regarding adverse birth outcomes (ABO) of Indigenous and Tribal women living in the remote tropical rainforest of Suriname, where mercury (Hg) use is abundant in artisanal gold mining, is not available. In the context of a health system analysis, we examined the association between Hg exposure, maternal sociodemographics on the ABO of Indigenous and Tribal women living in Suriname’s interior and its capital, Paramaribo. ABO were determined in pregnant women enrolled from December 2016 to July 2019 in the Caribbean Consortium for Environmental and Occupational Health prospective environmental epidemiologic cohort study. Associations were explored using Pearson’s χ2-test and the Mann–Whitney U-test. Among 351 singleton participants, 32% were Indigenous, residing mainly in the interior (86.8%), and 23.1% had ABO. Indigenous participants had higher rates of ABO (29.8% vs. 19.8%) and preterm birth (PTB) (21.2% vs. 12.4%), higher Hg levels, delivered at a younger age, were less educated, and had lower household income compared to Tribal participants. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that Indigenous participants had higher odds of ABO (OR = 3.60; 95% CI 1.70–7.63) and PTB (OR = 3.43; 95% CI 1.48–7.96) compared with Tribal participants, independent of Hg exposure and age at delivery. These results highlight the importance of effective risk reduction measures in support of Indigenous mothers, families, and communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: adverse birth outcome; preterm birth; ethnicity; indigenous; tribal; mercury exposure; Suriname adverse birth outcome; preterm birth; ethnicity; indigenous; tribal; mercury exposure; Suriname
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baldewsingh, G.K.; Hindori-Mohangoo, A.D.; van Eer, E.D.; Covert, H.H.; Shankar, A.; Wickliffe, J.K.; Shi, L.; Lichtveld, M.Y.; Zijlmans, W.C.W.R. Association of Mercury Exposure and Maternal Sociodemographics on Birth Outcomes of Indigenous and Tribal Women in Suriname. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126370

AMA Style

Baldewsingh GK, Hindori-Mohangoo AD, van Eer ED, Covert HH, Shankar A, Wickliffe JK, Shi L, Lichtveld MY, Zijlmans WCWR. Association of Mercury Exposure and Maternal Sociodemographics on Birth Outcomes of Indigenous and Tribal Women in Suriname. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126370

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baldewsingh, Gaitree K., Ashna D. Hindori-Mohangoo, Edward D. van Eer, Hannah H. Covert, Arti Shankar, Jeffrey K. Wickliffe, Lizheng Shi, Maureen Y. Lichtveld, and Wilco C. W. R. Zijlmans. 2021. "Association of Mercury Exposure and Maternal Sociodemographics on Birth Outcomes of Indigenous and Tribal Women in Suriname" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6370. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126370

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