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Article

COVID-19 Scientific Facts vs. Conspiracy Theories: Is Science Failing to Pass Its Message?

1
Department of Social Sciences, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Nicosia, Nicosia 2417, Cyprus
2
Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678, Cyprus
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Riccardo Polosa, Pietro Ferrara, Luciana Albano, Venera Tomaselli, David Berrigan and Jimmy T. Efird
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126343
Received: 28 April 2021 / Revised: 25 May 2021 / Accepted: 9 June 2021 / Published: 11 June 2021
Science may be failing to convince a significant number of people about COVID-19 scientific facts and needed public health measures. Individual and social factors are behind believing conspiracy theories. Adults (N = 1001) were asked to rate their beliefs in various conspiracy theories circulating in social media, rate their psychological distress relating to COVID-19, rate their trust in science to solve COVID-19 problems, and rate their willingness to adhere to measures regarding social distancing and quarantine. The findings showed conspiracy theories are widely believed and related to lower age, lower education, living in less densely populated areas, and lower income. Stronger conspiracy theory beliefs predicted science mistrust and unwillingness to adhere to public health measures. Psychological state was a strong predictor of conspiracy beliefs. Recommendations, stemming from the findings, for reducing such beliefs and better serving public health are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; conspiracy theories; psychological state; public health; social distancing; quarantine measures COVID-19; conspiracy theories; psychological state; public health; social distancing; quarantine measures
MDPI and ACS Style

Constantinou, M.; Kagialis, A.; Karekla, M. COVID-19 Scientific Facts vs. Conspiracy Theories: Is Science Failing to Pass Its Message? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6343. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126343

AMA Style

Constantinou M, Kagialis A, Karekla M. COVID-19 Scientific Facts vs. Conspiracy Theories: Is Science Failing to Pass Its Message? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6343. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126343

Chicago/Turabian Style

Constantinou, Marios, Antonios Kagialis, and Maria Karekla. 2021. "COVID-19 Scientific Facts vs. Conspiracy Theories: Is Science Failing to Pass Its Message?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6343. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18126343

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