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Article

What Works in Community-Led Suicide Prevention: Perspectives of Wesley LifeForce Network Coordinators

1
Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC 3010, Australia
2
Centre for Health Policy, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, VIC 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Lisa N. Sharwood, Fiona Shand and Jesse Young
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 6084; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116084
Received: 4 May 2021 / Revised: 2 June 2021 / Accepted: 3 June 2021 / Published: 4 June 2021
Community coalitions have been recognised as an important vehicle to advance health promotion and address relevant local health issues in communities, yet little is known about their effectiveness in the field of suicide prevention. The Wesley Lifeforce Suicide Prevention Networks program consists of a national cohort of local community-led suicide prevention networks. This study drew on a nationally representative survey and the perspectives of coordinators of these networks to identify the key factors underpinning positive perceived network member and community outcomes. Survey data were analysed through descriptive statistics and linear regression analyses. Networks typically reported better outcomes for network members and communities if they had been in existence for longer, had a focus on the general community, and had conducted more network meetings and internal processes, as well as specific community-focused activities. Study findings strengthen the evidence base for effective network operations and lend further support to the merit of community coalitions in the field of suicide prevention, with implications for similar initiatives, policymakers, and wider sector stakeholders seeking to address suicide prevention issues at a local community level. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicide; suicide prevention; community coalitions; community networks suicide; suicide prevention; community coalitions; community networks
MDPI and ACS Style

Reifels, L.; Morgan, A.; Too, L.S.; Schlichthorst, M.; Williamson, M.; Jordan, H. What Works in Community-Led Suicide Prevention: Perspectives of Wesley LifeForce Network Coordinators. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6084. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116084

AMA Style

Reifels L, Morgan A, Too LS, Schlichthorst M, Williamson M, Jordan H. What Works in Community-Led Suicide Prevention: Perspectives of Wesley LifeForce Network Coordinators. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(11):6084. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116084

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reifels, Lennart, Amy Morgan, Lay S. Too, Marisa Schlichthorst, Michelle Williamson, and Helen Jordan. 2021. "What Works in Community-Led Suicide Prevention: Perspectives of Wesley LifeForce Network Coordinators" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 11: 6084. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116084

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