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Inequalities in Periodontal Disease According to Insurance Schemes in Thailand

1
Department of Oral Health Promotion, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan
2
Bureau of Dental Health, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi 11000, Thailand
3
Division for Regional Community Development, Liaison Center for Innovative Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8575, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115945
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 27 May 2021 / Accepted: 28 May 2021 / Published: 1 June 2021
Few studies have considered the effects of insurance on periodontal disease. We aimed to investigate the association between insurance schemes and periodontal disease among adults, using Thailand’s National Oral Health Survey (2017) data. A modified Community Periodontal Index was used to measure periodontal disease. Insurance schemes were categorized into the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS), Civil Servant Medical Benefit Scheme (CSMBS), Social Security Scheme (SSS), and “others”. Poisson regression was applied to estimate the prevalence ratios (PRs) of insurance schemes for periodontal disease, with adjustment for age, gender, residential location, education attainment, and income. The data of 4534 participants (mean age, 39.6 ± 2.9 years; 2194 men, 2340 women) were analyzed. The proportions of participants with gingivitis or periodontitis were 87.6% and 25.9%, respectively. In covariate adjusted models, lowest education (PRs, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01–1.06) and UCS (PRs, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.08) yielded significantly higher PRs for gingivitis, whereas lowest education (PRs, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05–1.37) and UCS (PRs, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.02–1.34) yielded substantially higher PRs for periodontitis. Insurance schemes may be social predictors of periodontal disease. For better oral health, reduced insurance inequalities are required to increase access to regular dental visits and utilization in Thailand. View Full-Text
Keywords: inequalities; periodontal disease; insurance; National Oral Health Survey inequalities; periodontal disease; insurance; National Oral Health Survey
MDPI and ACS Style

Srinarupat, J.; Oshiro, A.; Zaitsu, T.; Prasertsom, P.; Niyomsilp, K.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Aida, J. Inequalities in Periodontal Disease According to Insurance Schemes in Thailand. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5945. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115945

AMA Style

Srinarupat J, Oshiro A, Zaitsu T, Prasertsom P, Niyomsilp K, Kawaguchi Y, Aida J. Inequalities in Periodontal Disease According to Insurance Schemes in Thailand. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(11):5945. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115945

Chicago/Turabian Style

Srinarupat, Jarassri, Akiko Oshiro, Takashi Zaitsu, Piyada Prasertsom, Kornkamol Niyomsilp, Yoko Kawaguchi, and Jun Aida. 2021. "Inequalities in Periodontal Disease According to Insurance Schemes in Thailand" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 11: 5945. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115945

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