Next Article in Journal
The Research on Patient Satisfaction with Remote Healthcare Prior to and during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Next Article in Special Issue
Education of Adolescents in the Prevention of HIV/AIDS in the Czech Republic
Previous Article in Journal
Missing Diagnoses during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Year in Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Familial Correlates of Leisure Time Activities among Polish Early School-Age Children: A Cross-Sectional Study
Brief Report

Psychosocial Working Conditions in School and Life Satisfaction among Adolescents in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 100, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Laura Dallolio
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5337; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105337
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 11 May 2021 / Accepted: 15 May 2021 / Published: 17 May 2021
Poor psychosocial working conditions in school have consistently been shown to be associated with adverse health among adolescents. However, the relationships between school demands, teacher support, and classmate support and positive aspects of health have not been explored to the same extent. The aim of this study was to examine differences in psychosocial working conditions in school and in life satisfaction by gender and by grade, and to investigate the association between psychosocial working conditions in school and life satisfaction among boys and girls, and among students in different grades. Data from the Swedish Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study of 2017/18 were used, consisting of 3614 students in Grades 5, 7, and 9 (~11, 13, and 15 years). Psychosocial working conditions in school were captured by indices of perceived school demands, teacher support, and classmate support. Life satisfaction was measured by the 11-step Cantril’s ladder (using cutoffs at >5 and >8, respectively). Whereas girls reported higher school demands than boys, higher levels of teacher and classmate support were reported by boys. Students in lower grades reported lower school demands but higher levels of teacher and classmate support compared with students in higher grades. Boys and students in lower grades were more likely to report high life satisfaction compared with girls and students in higher grades. Results from binary logistic regression analyzes showed that school demands were inversely associated with life satisfaction, and that higher levels of teacher support and classmate support were associated with high life satisfaction. These results were found for both boys and girls, and for students in all grades. The findings indicate that schools have the potential to promote positive health among students. View Full-Text
Keywords: school demands; teacher support; classmate support; life satisfaction; positive health; Sweden school demands; teacher support; classmate support; life satisfaction; positive health; Sweden
MDPI and ACS Style

Wahlström, J.; Låftman, S.B.; Modin, B.; Löfstedt, P. Psychosocial Working Conditions in School and Life Satisfaction among Adolescents in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5337. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105337

AMA Style

Wahlström J, Låftman SB, Modin B, Löfstedt P. Psychosocial Working Conditions in School and Life Satisfaction among Adolescents in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(10):5337. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105337

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wahlström, Joakim; Låftman, Sara B.; Modin, Bitte; Löfstedt, Petra. 2021. "Psychosocial Working Conditions in School and Life Satisfaction among Adolescents in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 10: 5337. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105337

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop