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Article

Burnout in Professional Psychotherapists: Relationships with Self-Compassion, Work–Life Balance, and Telepressure

Human Sciences Research Centre, University of Derby, Derby DE22 1GB, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ben Rattray, Bart Roelands and Kristy Martin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5308; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105308
Received: 28 April 2021 / Revised: 5 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 May 2021 / Published: 17 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Fatigue in Occupational, Sporting and Clinical Settings)
Though negative impacts of COVID-19 on occupational mental health have been reported, the mental health of psychotherapists has not been evaluated in depth. As this occupational group treats ever-increasing mental health problems, it is essential to appraise key factors for their mental health. Accordingly, this study aimed to explore burnout of professional psychotherapists. A total of 110 participants completed self-report measures regarding burnout, self-compassion, work–life balance and telepressure. Correlation, regression and moderation analyses were conducted. Both of the burnout components—emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation—were positively associated with weekly working hours and telepressure, and negatively associated with age, self-compassion and work–life balance. Weekly working hours and work–life balance were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Lastly, self-compassion partially mediated the relationship between work–life balance and emotional exhaustion but did not mediate the relationship between work–life balance and depersonalisation. The findings suggest that maintaining high work–life balance is particularly important for the mental health of psychotherapists, protecting them from burnout. Moreover, self-compassion needs to be cultivated to mitigate emotional exhaustion. Mental health care for this occupational group needs to be implemented to achieve sustainable mental health care for workers and the public. View Full-Text
Keywords: self-compassion; telepressure; work–life balance; burnout; depersonalisation; emotional exhaustion self-compassion; telepressure; work–life balance; burnout; depersonalisation; emotional exhaustion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kotera, Y.; Maxwell-Jones, R.; Edwards, A.-M.; Knutton, N. Burnout in Professional Psychotherapists: Relationships with Self-Compassion, Work–Life Balance, and Telepressure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105308

AMA Style

Kotera Y, Maxwell-Jones R, Edwards A-M, Knutton N. Burnout in Professional Psychotherapists: Relationships with Self-Compassion, Work–Life Balance, and Telepressure. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(10):5308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105308

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kotera, Yasuhiro, Robert Maxwell-Jones, Ann-Marie Edwards, and Natalie Knutton. 2021. "Burnout in Professional Psychotherapists: Relationships with Self-Compassion, Work–Life Balance, and Telepressure" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 10: 5308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105308

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