Next Article in Journal
Validity and Reliability of the Newly Developed Malay-Language Health Belief of Bloating (HB-Bloat) Scale
Previous Article in Journal
Relationship between Individual Social Capital and Functional Ability among Older People in Anhui Province, China
Open AccessBrief Report

Screening for Park Access during a Primary Care Social Determinants Screen

1
UCSF Center for Nature and Health, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland, 5220 Claremont Ave, Oakland, CA 94608, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, 550 16th Street, Box 0110, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, 550 16th Street, Second Floor, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA
4
UCSF Center for Health and Community, 3333 California St., Suite 465, Campus Box 0844, San Francisco, CA 94143-0844, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082777
Received: 15 March 2020 / Revised: 11 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
While there is evidence that access to nature and parks benefits pediatric health, it is unclear how low-income families living in an urban center acknowledge or prioritize access to parks. Methods: We conducted a study about access to parks by pediatric patients in a health system serving low-income families. Adult caregivers of pediatric patients completed a survey to identify and prioritize unmet social and economic needs, including access to parks. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to explore associations between lack of access to parks and sociodemographic variables. We also explored the extent to which access to parks competed with other needs. Results: The survey was completed by 890 caregivers; 151 (17%) identified “access to green spaces/parks/playgrounds” as an unmet need, compared to 397 (45%) who endorsed “running out of food before you had money or food stamps to buy more”. Being at or below the poverty line doubled the odds (Odds ratio 1.96, 95% CI 1.16–3.31) of lacking access to a park (reference group: above the poverty line), and lacking a high school degree nearly doubled the odds. Thirty-three of the 151 (22%) caregivers who identified access to parks as an unmet need prioritized it as one of three top unmet needs. Families who faced competing needs of housing, food, and employment insecurity were less likely to prioritize park access (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Clinical interventions to increase park access would benefit from an understanding of the social and economic adversity faced by patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatrics; social determinants of health; built environment; mental health; stress; park use; urban greenspace; urban nature; poverty; health inequity pediatrics; social determinants of health; built environment; mental health; stress; park use; urban greenspace; urban nature; poverty; health inequity
MDPI and ACS Style

Razani, N.; Long, D.; Hessler, D.; Rutherford, G.W.; Gottlieb, L.M. Screening for Park Access during a Primary Care Social Determinants Screen. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2777.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop