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Article

Relative Validity of an Online Herb and Spice Consumption Questionnaire

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201-8117, USA
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2757; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082757
Received: 26 March 2020 / Revised: 11 April 2020 / Accepted: 13 April 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Culinary herbs and spices contribute bioactives to the diet, which act to reduce systemic inflammation and associated disease. Investigating the health effects of herb/spice consumption is hampered, however, by a scarcity of dietary assessment tools designed to collect herb/spice data. The objective of this study was to determine the relative validity of an online 28-item herb/spices intake questionnaire (HSQ). In randomized order, 62 volunteers residing in Idaho, USA, completed the online Diet History Questionnaire III + the HSQ followed one week later by one of two comparative methods: 7-day food records or three telephone-administered 24-h dietary recalls. Relative validity of the HSQ was tested two ways: (1) by comparing herb/spice intakes between the HSQ and comparator, and (2) by determining the correlation between herb/spice data and Healthy Eating Index 2015 score. The HSQ and both comparators identified black pepper, cinnamon and garlic powder as the three most commonly used herbs/spices. The HSQ captured significantly higher measures of the number and amount of herbs/spices consumed than the comparators. The number of herbs/spices consumed was significantly directly correlated with diet quality for the HSQ. These results support the ability of the HSQ to record general herb/spice use, yet suggest that further validation testing is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: herbs; spices; questionnaire; validity herbs; spices; questionnaire; validity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Blanton, C. Relative Validity of an Online Herb and Spice Consumption Questionnaire. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2757. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082757

AMA Style

Blanton C. Relative Validity of an Online Herb and Spice Consumption Questionnaire. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2757. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082757

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blanton, Cynthia. 2020. "Relative Validity of an Online Herb and Spice Consumption Questionnaire" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2757. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082757

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