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Article

Increasing Incidence of Liposarcoma: A Population-Based Study of National Surveillance Databases, 2001–2016

1
Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
2
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2710; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082710
Received: 17 March 2020 / Revised: 10 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Rare cancers, affecting 1 in 5 cancer patients, disproportionally contribute to cancer mortality. This research focuses on liposarcoma, an understudied rare cancer with unknown risk factors and limited treatment options. Liposarcoma incident cases were identified from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) program and the combined SEER-National Program of Cancer Registries (CNPCR) between 2001–2016. Incidence rates (age-adjusted and age-specific), 5-year survival, and the time trends were determined using SEER*stat software. Three-dimensional visualization of age–time curves was conducted for males and females. SEER liposarcoma cases represented ~30% (n = 11,162) of the nationwide pool (N = 37,499). Both sources of data showed males accounting for ~60% of the cases; 82%–86% cases were identified among whites. Age-adjusted incidence was greater among males vs. females and whites vs. blacks, whereas survival did not differ by sex and race. The dedifferentiated (57.2%), pleomorphic (64.1%), and retroperitoneal (63.9%) tumors had the worse survival. Nationwide, liposarcoma rates increased by 19%, with the annual percent increase (APC) of 1.43% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12–1.74). The APC was greater for males vs. females (1.67% vs. 0.89%) and retroperitoneal vs. extremity tumors (1.94% vs. 0.58%). Thus, incidence increased faster in the high-risk subgroup (males), and for retroperitoneal tumors, the low-survival subtype. The SEER generally over-estimated the rates and time trends compared to nationwide data but under-estimated time trends for retroperitoneal tumors. The time trends suggest an interaction between genetic and non-genetic modifiable risk factors may play a role in the etiology of this malignancy. Differences between SEER and CNCPR findings emphasize the need for nationwide cancer surveillance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Liposarcoma; epidemiology; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) program; rare cancers Liposarcoma; epidemiology; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) program; rare cancers
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bock, S.; Hoffmann, D.G.; Jiang, Y.; Chen, H.; Il’yasova, D. Increasing Incidence of Liposarcoma: A Population-Based Study of National Surveillance Databases, 2001–2016. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2710. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082710

AMA Style

Bock S, Hoffmann DG, Jiang Y, Chen H, Il’yasova D. Increasing Incidence of Liposarcoma: A Population-Based Study of National Surveillance Databases, 2001–2016. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2710. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082710

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bock, Suzanne, Douglas G. Hoffmann, Yi Jiang, Hao Chen, and Dora Il’yasova. 2020. "Increasing Incidence of Liposarcoma: A Population-Based Study of National Surveillance Databases, 2001–2016" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2710. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082710

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