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Article

Maternal Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Pregnancy Complications in Victoria, Australia

1
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 23, Hobart, TAS 7001, Australia
2
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD 4006, Australia
3
Clinical and Population Perinatal Health Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2572; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072572
Received: 16 February 2020 / Revised: 7 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 April 2020 / Published: 9 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Ambient Environment and Reproductive Health)
The relationship between maternal exposure to ambient air pollution and pregnancy complications is not well characterized. We aimed to explore the relationship between maternal exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and placental abruption. Using administrative data, we defined a state-wide cohort of singleton pregnancies born between 1 March 2012 and 31 December 2015 in Victoria, Australia. Annual average NO2 and PM2.5 was assigned to maternal residence at the time of birth. 285,594 singleton pregnancies were included. An IQR increase in NO2 (3.9 ppb) was associated with reduced likelihood of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (RR 0.89; 95%CI 0.86, 0.91), GDM (RR 0.92; 95%CI 0.90, 0.94) and placental abruption (RR 0.81; 95%CI 0.69, 0.95). Mixed observations and smaller effect sizes were observed for IQR increases in PM2.5 (1.3 µg/m3) and pregnancy complications; reduced likelihood of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (RR 0.95; 95%CI 0.93, 0.97), increased likelihood of GDM (RR 1.02; 95%CI 1.00, 1.03) and no relationship for placental abruption. In this exploratory study using an annual metric of exposure, findings were largely inconsistent with a priori expectations and further research involving temporally resolved exposure estimates are required. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; pregnancy; gestational diabetes mellitus; preeclampsia; placental abruption air pollution; pregnancy; gestational diabetes mellitus; preeclampsia; placental abruption
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MDPI and ACS Style

Melody, S.M.; Wills, K.; Knibbs, L.D.; Ford, J.; Venn, A.; Johnston, F. Maternal Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Pregnancy Complications in Victoria, Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2572. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072572

AMA Style

Melody SM, Wills K, Knibbs LD, Ford J, Venn A, Johnston F. Maternal Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Pregnancy Complications in Victoria, Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2572. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072572

Chicago/Turabian Style

Melody, Shannon M., Karen Wills, Luke D. Knibbs, Jane Ford, Alison Venn, and Fay Johnston. 2020. "Maternal Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Pregnancy Complications in Victoria, Australia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2572. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072572

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