Next Article in Journal
Shifting the Care of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus from Hospital to Primary Health Care Institutions through an Educational Intervention for Health Care Professionals: An Example from Rural China
Previous Article in Journal
Short- and Long-Term Structural Characterization of Cured-in-Place Pipe Liner with Reinforced Glass Fiber Material
Open AccessReview

Budgeting for Environmental Health Services in Healthcare Facilities: A Ten-Step Model for Planning and Costing

1
The Water Institute, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
2
School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 2075; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17062075
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 13 March 2020 / Accepted: 17 March 2020 / Published: 20 March 2020
Environmental health services (EHS) in healthcare facilities (HCFs) are critical for safe care provision, yet their availability in low- and middle-income countries is low. A poor understanding of costs hinders progress towards adequate provision. Methods are inconsistent and poorly documented in costing literature, suggesting opportunities to improve evidence. The goal of this research was to develop a model to guide budgeting for EHS in HCFs. Based on 47 studies selected through a systematic review, we identified discrete budgeting steps, developed codes to define each step, and ordered steps into a model. We identified good practices based on a review of additional selected guidelines for costing EHS and HCFs. Our model comprises ten steps in three phases: planning, data collection, and synthesis. Costing-stakeholders define the costing purpose, relevant EHS, and cost scope; assess the EHS delivery context; develop a costing plan; and identify data sources (planning). Stakeholders then execute their costing plan and evaluate the data quality (data collection). Finally, stakeholders calculate costs and disseminate findings (synthesis). We present three hypothetical costing examples and discuss good practices, including using costing frameworks, selecting appropriate indicators to measure the quantity and quality of EHS, and iterating planning and data collection to select appropriate costing approaches and identify data gaps. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthcare facilities; environmental health; water, sanitation, and hygiene; WaSH; waste management; cleaning; infection prevention and control; costing; budgeting healthcare facilities; environmental health; water, sanitation, and hygiene; WaSH; waste management; cleaning; infection prevention and control; costing; budgeting
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Anderson, D.M.; Cronk, R.; Best, L.; Radin, M.; Schram, H.; Tracy, J.W.; Bartram, J. Budgeting for Environmental Health Services in Healthcare Facilities: A Ten-Step Model for Planning and Costing. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2075.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop