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Open AccessArticle

Obesity and Obesogenic Behaviors in Asian American Children with Immigrant and US-Born Mothers

1
California Department of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency Program, Sacramento, CA 95899, USA
2
Berkeley School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1786; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051786
Received: 17 February 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 7 March 2020 / Published: 10 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Health Care Access of Vulnerable Populations)
Child obesity is understudied in Asian Americans, which include a growing population of recent immigrants. We examined the relationship between maternal nativity and time in the US, and obesity and obesogenic behaviors among Asian American children. We analyzed public-use data from the 2013–2016 California Health Interview Survey for Asian American children ages 2 to 11 years. We used logistic regression to determine the odds of obesity and obesogenic behaviors associated with maternal nativity and time in the US. This study included n = 609 children. Children of US-born mothers had lower odds of obesity (adjusted odds ratio, AOR, 0.12; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.91) and lower fruit intake (AOR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.81) than children of recent immigrants (< 5 years in the US). Asian American children with recent immigrant mothers are more likely to be obese and eat less fruit than children with US-born mothers. Efforts to prevent obesity and increase fruit consumption are particularly important for this vulnerable population of children of recent immigrants. View Full-Text
Keywords: obesity; immigrants; nativity; Asian American; children obesity; immigrants; nativity; Asian American; children
MDPI and ACS Style

Argueza, B.R.; Sokal-Gutierrez, K.; Madsen, K.A. Obesity and Obesogenic Behaviors in Asian American Children with Immigrant and US-Born Mothers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1786.

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