Next Article in Journal
External Validation of the ‘PHYT in Dementia’, a Theoretical Model Promoting Physical Activity in People with Dementia
Next Article in Special Issue
Tactical Analysis According to Age-level Groups during a 4 vs. 4 Plus Goalkeepers Small-sided Game
Previous Article in Journal
Long-Term Subjective Outcomes of Barbed Reposition Pharyngoplasty for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Treatment
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evaluation of the Pre-Planned and Non-Planed Agility Performance: Comparison between Individual and Team Sports
Open AccessArticle

Pacing and Performance Analysis of the World’s Fastest Female Ultra-Triathlete in 5x and 10x Ironman

1
Bouve College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Thermopylon 7, 18450 Nikaia, Greece
3
Faculty of Sport Sciences, European University of Madrid, C/ Tajo, s/n. Urb. El Bosque, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón, Spain
4
Grupo de Investigación en Cultura, Educación y Sociedad, Universidad de la Costa, Barranquilla 080002, Colombia
5
Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Pestalozzistr. 24, CH-8001 Zurich, Switzerland
6
Medbase St. Gallen Am Vadianplatz, Vadianstrasse 26, 9001 St. Gallen, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051543
Received: 29 January 2020 / Revised: 18 February 2020 / Accepted: 25 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
The aim of the present case study was to analyse the performance data of the world’s best female ultra-triathlete setting a new world record in a Quintuple (5xIronman) and Deca Iron (10xIronman) ultra-triathlon, within and between race days, and between disciplines (cycling and running) and races (Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon). The subject was an elite female triathlete (52 kg, 169 cm) born in 1983. At the time of her world record in Quintuple Iron ultra-triathlon she had an age of 35 years and at the time of the world record in Deca Iron ultra-triathlon 36 years old. The distribution of time spent in each discipline and transitions was 8.48% in swimming, 51.67% cycling, 37.91% running, and 1.94% transitions. There was no difference between the race days of the average speed neither in cycling nor running. The running pace had a within-day variation larger than the cycling pace, and also varied more between race days. In conclusion, the world’s best female ultra-triathlete adopted a steady (even) pacing strategy for both cycling and running, without substantial variations within- or between race days, for both the world record in a Quintuple and a Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. View Full-Text
Keywords: cycling; fatigue; running; swimming; ultra-endurance cycling; fatigue; running; swimming; ultra-endurance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sousa, C.V.; Nikolaidis, P.T.; Clemente-Suárez, V.J.; Rosemann, T.; Knechtle, B. Pacing and Performance Analysis of the World’s Fastest Female Ultra-Triathlete in 5x and 10x Ironman. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1543.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop