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Open AccessArticle

Garden-Based Integrated Intervention for Improving Children’s Eating Behavior for Vegetables

by Seon-Ok Kim 1 and Sin-Ae Park 1,2,*
1
Department of Bio and Healing Convergence, Graduate School, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea
2
Department of Environmental Health Science, Sanghuh College of Life Science, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1257; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041257
Received: 3 January 2020 / Revised: 12 February 2020 / Accepted: 13 February 2020 / Published: 15 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evidence-Based Nature for Human Health)
This study was conducted to develop and verify the effects of a garden-based integrated intervention for improving children’s eating behavior for vegetables. A pre-post-test experimental design was employed. The participants were 202 elementary school students (average age: 11.6 ± 1.5 years). The garden-based integrated intervention program was conducted during regular school hours for a total of 12 weeks. The program, based on a mediator model for improving children’s eating behavior, included gardening, nutritional education, and cooking activities utilizing harvests. In order to examine effects of the program, the mediating factors related to children’s eating behavior were evaluated using pre-post questionnaires. As a result of the program, dietary self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, gardening knowledge, nutrition knowledge, vegetable preference, and vegetable consumption were significantly increased, and food neophobia was significantly decreased. In addition, there were positive correlations between most mediating factors. Thus, the garden-based integrated intervention developed in this study was effective in improving children’s eating behavior for vegetables. View Full-Text
Keywords: eating habits; gardening; horticultural therapy; urban agriculture; mediating factors eating habits; gardening; horticultural therapy; urban agriculture; mediating factors
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Kim, S.-O.; Park, S.-A. Garden-Based Integrated Intervention for Improving Children’s Eating Behavior for Vegetables. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1257.

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