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Latent Class Analysis Offers Insight into the Complex Food Environments of Native American Communities: Findings from the Randomly Selected OPREVENT2 Trial Baseline Sample

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School of Human Nutrition, Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada
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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
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University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
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University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
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Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, DC 20001, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1237; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041237
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 18 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 14 February 2020
Native Americans (NAs) experience a high burden of obesity and diabetes, yet previous research has not holistically described the unique food environments of NA communities. The objective of this paper is to describe the subgroups and demographic characteristics related to NA household food environments. Surveys collected food getting, food assistance, and sociodemographic variables from randomly selected adults from three NA communities (n = 300) in the Midwest and Southwest. Exploratory latent class analysis (LCA) identified the appropriate number of subgroups based on indicator responses. After assigning participants to classes, demographic differences were examined using bivariate analyses. NA household food environments could be described using two subgroups (“lower” and “higher access household food environments”). The “lower access” group had significantly higher age, smaller household size, and fewer children per household than the “higher access” group, while body mass index (BMI) did not significantly vary. This is the first LCA of NA household food environments and highlights the need for approaches that characterize the complexity of these environments. Findings demonstrate that NA household food environments can be described by developing subgroups based on patterns of market and traditional food getting, and food assistance utilization. Understanding NA household food environments could identify tailored individual and community-level approaches to promoting healthy eating for NA Nations. View Full-Text
Keywords: food environment; Native Americans; obesity food environment; Native Americans; obesity
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Jock, B.W.; Bandeen Roche, K.; Caldas, S.V.; Redmond, L.; Fleischhacker, S.; Gittelsohn, J. Latent Class Analysis Offers Insight into the Complex Food Environments of Native American Communities: Findings from the Randomly Selected OPREVENT2 Trial Baseline Sample. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1237.

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