Next Article in Journal
Spatiotemporal Analysis of the Population Risk of Congenital Microcephaly in Pernambuco State, Brazil
Previous Article in Journal
Association Between Mycotoxin Exposure and Dietary Habits in Colorectal Cancer Development Among a Polish Population: A Study Protocol
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fuzzy Logic-Based Risk Assessment of a Parallel Robot for Elbow and Wrist Rehabilitation
Open AccessArticle

Low-Cost Robotic Guide Based on a Motor Imagery Brain–Computer Interface for Arm Assisted Rehabilitation

1
Instituto de Automática e Informática Industrial, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València, Spain
2
Departament de Psicobiologia, Facultat de Psicologia, Universitat de València, 46010 València, Spain
3
Facultad de Ingeniería, Ingeniería Mecatrónica, Universidad Autónoma de Bucaramanga, Bucaramanga 680003, Colombia
4
Facultad de Educación, Universidad Internacional de la Rioja, 26006 Logroño, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030699
Received: 23 December 2019 / Revised: 10 January 2020 / Accepted: 17 January 2020 / Published: 21 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Robotic Devices for Neurologic Rehabilitation)
Motor imagery has been suggested as an efficient alternative to improve the rehabilitation process of affected limbs. In this study, a low-cost robotic guide is implemented so that linear position can be controlled via the user’s motor imagination of movement intention. The patient can use this device to move the arm attached to the guide according to their own intentions. The first objective of this study was to check the feasibility and safety of the designed robotic guide controlled via a motor imagery (MI)-based brain–computer interface (MI-BCI) in healthy individuals, with the ultimate aim to apply it to rehabilitation patients. The second objective was to determine which are the most convenient MI strategies to control the different assisted rehabilitation arm movements. The results of this study show a better performance when the BCI task is controlled with an action–action MI strategy versus an action–relaxation one. No statistically significant difference was found between the two action–action MI strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: robotic rehabilitation; robot-assisted therapy; brain computer interfaces in neurorehabilitation; EEG sensors robotic rehabilitation; robot-assisted therapy; brain computer interfaces in neurorehabilitation; EEG sensors
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Quiles, E.; Suay, F.; Candela, G.; Chio, N.; Jiménez, M.; Álvarez-Kurogi, L. Low-Cost Robotic Guide Based on a Motor Imagery Brain–Computer Interface for Arm Assisted Rehabilitation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 699.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop