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Article

Recruiting and Engaging American Indian and Alaska Native Teens and Young Adults in a SMS Help-Seeking Intervention: Lessons Learned from the BRAVE Study

1
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, 2121 SW Broadway #300, Portland, OR 97201, USA
2
Allyson Kelley & Associates, Principal, 69705 Lake Drive, Sisters, OR 97759, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9437; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249437
Received: 28 October 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 14 December 2020 / Published: 16 December 2020
This paper shares lessons learned recruiting and engaging participants in the BRAVE study, a randomized controlled trial carried out by the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and the mHealth Impact Lab. The team recruited 2330 American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) teens and young adults nationwide (15–24 years old) via social media channels and text message and enrolled 1030 to participate in the 9 month study. Teens and young adults who enrolled in this study received either: 8 weeks of BRAVE text messages designed to improve mental health, help-seeking skills, and promote cultural pride and resilience; or 8 weeks of Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) text messages, designed to elevate and re-affirm Native voices in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine; and then received the other set of messages. Results indicate that social media channels like Facebook and Instagram can be used to recruit AI/AN teens and young adults. Retention in this study was high, with 87% of participants completing both the BRAVE and STEM intervention arms. Lessons learned from this process may help teen and young adult-serving organizations, prevention programs, policy makers, researchers, and educators as they support the next generation of AI/AN change makers. View Full-Text
Keywords: American Indian; Alaska Native (AIAN); adolescent; recruitment and retention; help-seeking skills; mHealth; SMS intervention American Indian; Alaska Native (AIAN); adolescent; recruitment and retention; help-seeking skills; mHealth; SMS intervention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stephens, D.; Peterson, R.; Singer, M.; Johnson, J.; Rushing, S.C.; Kelley, A. Recruiting and Engaging American Indian and Alaska Native Teens and Young Adults in a SMS Help-Seeking Intervention: Lessons Learned from the BRAVE Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249437

AMA Style

Stephens D, Peterson R, Singer M, Johnson J, Rushing SC, Kelley A. Recruiting and Engaging American Indian and Alaska Native Teens and Young Adults in a SMS Help-Seeking Intervention: Lessons Learned from the BRAVE Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249437

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stephens, David, Roger Peterson, Michelle Singer, Jacqueline Johnson, Stephanie Craig Rushing, and Allyson Kelley. 2020. "Recruiting and Engaging American Indian and Alaska Native Teens and Young Adults in a SMS Help-Seeking Intervention: Lessons Learned from the BRAVE Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 24: 9437. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249437

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