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Open AccessArticle

Examining Negative Emotional Symptoms and Psychological Wellbeing of Australian Sport Officials

1
Department of Sport and Exercise Science, LUNEX International University of Health, Exercise and Sports, Differdange, 4671 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
2
Centre for Sport Research, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8265; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218265
Received: 15 October 2020 / Revised: 4 November 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Sport Workforce)
Sports officials are exposed to numerous performance and personal stressors, however little is known about their mental health and psychological wellbeing. This study investigated levels of mental health and psychological wellbeing of sports officials in Australia, and the demographic, officiating, and workplace factors associated with these outcomes. An online survey consisting of demographic and officiating questions, and measures of work engagement, mental health and psychological wellbeing was completed by 317 officials. A negative emotional symptoms score was computed. Associations between key demographic, officiating, and workplace factors with negative emotional symptoms and psychological wellbeing were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Officials who were younger, not in a committed relationship, having lower levels of education, and less officiating experience reported higher levels of negative emotional symptoms, while males, older than 50 years, in a committed relationship and more officiating experience had higher levels of psychological wellbeing. The ability to self-manage workload and demonstrate professional autonomy were strongly associated with negative emotional symptoms and psychological wellbeing. Officials reported high negative emotional symptoms, but also high levels of psychological wellbeing. The ability to manage workload and to express professional autonomy are important determinants of mental health and wellbeing levels of sports officials. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; depression; anxiety; stress; workload; control mental health; depression; anxiety; stress; workload; control
MDPI and ACS Style

Carson, F.; Dynon, N.; Santoro, J.; Kremer, P. Examining Negative Emotional Symptoms and Psychological Wellbeing of Australian Sport Officials. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8265. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218265

AMA Style

Carson F, Dynon N, Santoro J, Kremer P. Examining Negative Emotional Symptoms and Psychological Wellbeing of Australian Sport Officials. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8265. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Carson, Fraser; Dynon, Natalie; Santoro, Joe; Kremer, Peter. 2020. "Examining Negative Emotional Symptoms and Psychological Wellbeing of Australian Sport Officials" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 21: 8265. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218265

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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