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Review

Complementary Feeding: Pitfalls for Health Outcomes

Department of Pediatrics, Vittore Buzzi Children’s Hospital, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7931; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217931
Received: 8 August 2020 / Revised: 19 October 2020 / Accepted: 26 October 2020 / Published: 29 October 2020
The term complementary feeding is defined as the period in which a progressive reduction of breastfeeding or infant-formula feeding takes place, while the infant is gradually introduced to solid foods. It is a crucial time in the infant’s life, not only because of the rapid changes in nutritional requirements and the consequent impact on infant growth and development, but also for a generation of lifelong flavor preferences and dietary habits that will influence mid and long-term health. There is an increasing body of evidence addressing the pivotal role of nutrition, especially during the early stages of life, and its link to the onset of chronic non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and allergic diseases. It is clear that the way in which a child is introduced to complementary foods may have effects on the individual’s entire life. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of complementary feeding timing, composition, and mode on mid and long-term health outcomes, in the light of the current evidence. Furthermore, we suggest practical tips for a healthy approach to complementary feeding, aiming at a healthy future, and highlight gaps to be filled. View Full-Text
Keywords: complementary feeding; infant nutrition; prevention; health outcomes; healthy growth; dietary habits; obesity complementary feeding; infant nutrition; prevention; health outcomes; healthy growth; dietary habits; obesity
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MDPI and ACS Style

D’Auria, E.; Borsani, B.; Pendezza, E.; Bosetti, A.; Paradiso, L.; Zuccotti, G.V.; Verduci, E. Complementary Feeding: Pitfalls for Health Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7931. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217931

AMA Style

D’Auria E, Borsani B, Pendezza E, Bosetti A, Paradiso L, Zuccotti GV, Verduci E. Complementary Feeding: Pitfalls for Health Outcomes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):7931. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217931

Chicago/Turabian Style

D’Auria, Enza, Barbara Borsani, Erica Pendezza, Alessandra Bosetti, Laura Paradiso, Gian V. Zuccotti, and Elvira Verduci. 2020. "Complementary Feeding: Pitfalls for Health Outcomes" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 7931. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217931

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