Next Article in Journal
Efficacy of a Multicomponent Intervention for Fibromyalgia Based on Pain Neuroscience Education, Exercise Therapy, Psychological Support, and Nature Exposure (NAT-FM): Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Next Article in Special Issue
A Literature Review and Gap Analysis of Emerging Technologies and New Trends in Gambling
Previous Article in Journal
Factors Associated with Initiation and Sustenance of Stress Management Behaviors in Veterinary Students: Testing of Multi-Theory Model (MTM)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Prevalence and Interpersonal Correlates of Internet Gaming Disorders among Chinese Adolescents
Open AccessArticle

Politically Motivated Internet Addiction: Relationships among Online Information Exposure, Internet Addiction, FOMO, Psychological Well-being, and Radicalism in Massive Political Turbulence

1
Department of Social Science, The Hang Seng University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
2
Department of Political Science, Lingnan University, Hong Kong 999077, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020633
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 14 January 2020 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 18 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet-Related Addictions and Health)
This research examines the mediating role of the tendency for Internet addiction, fear of missing out (FOMO), and psychological well-being in the relationship between online exposure to movement-related information and support for radical actions. A questionnaire survey that targets tertiary students was conducted during the Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill (Anti-ELAB) Movement (N = 290). The findings reveal the mediating effect of Internet addiction and depression as the main relationship. These findings enrich the literature of political communication by addressing the political impact of Internet use beyond digital architecture. From the perspective of psychology, this research echoes the literature that concerns depression symptoms driven by a protest environment. Radical political attitudes driven by depression during protests should also be concerned based on the findings of this survey. View Full-Text
Keywords: Internet addiction; depression; radicalization; social movement; Hong Kong Internet addiction; depression; radicalization; social movement; Hong Kong
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tang, G.; Hung, E.P.W.; Au-Yeung, H.-K.C.; Yuen, S. Politically Motivated Internet Addiction: Relationships among Online Information Exposure, Internet Addiction, FOMO, Psychological Well-being, and Radicalism in Massive Political Turbulence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 633.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop