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Article

Affective Outcomes of Group versus Lone Green Exercise Participation

1
School of Sport, Rehabilitation and Exercise Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
2
School of Life Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
3
Social Farms & Gardens, The GreenHouse, Hereford Street, Bristol BS3 4NA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020624
Received: 6 December 2019 / Revised: 11 January 2020 / Accepted: 13 January 2020 / Published: 18 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Green Exercise and Health Promotion)
‘Green exercise’ (being physically active within a natural environment) research has examined the influence of environmental setting on health and wellbeing-related exercise outcomes. However, it is not known whether social exercise settings influence green exercise-associated changes in mood, self-esteem, and connection to nature. This study directly compared outcomes of participating in green exercise alone compared to in a group. Using repeated measures, counterbalanced and randomized-crossover design, participants (n = 40) completed two 3 km runs around sports fields. These fields had a relatively flat grass terrain, predominant view of trees, and open grassland. On one occasion participants ran alone and on the other they ran in a group of 4–5 participants. Questionnaire measures of mood, self-esteem, and connection to nature were completed immediately pre- and post-run. Across all of the measures, two-way mixed ANOVAs found that there were statistically significant effects for time but not for time-by-condition interactions. The simplest interpretation of this finding is that social setting does not influence individuals’ attainment of the psychological outcomes of green exercise participation. However, we discuss the possibility that more complex processes might underpin this finding. View Full-Text
Keywords: green exercise; group; social; mood; self-esteem; environment; nature green exercise; group; social; mood; self-esteem; environment; nature
MDPI and ACS Style

Rogerson, M.; Colbeck, I.; Bragg, R.; Dosumu, A.; Griffin, M. Affective Outcomes of Group versus Lone Green Exercise Participation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020624

AMA Style

Rogerson M, Colbeck I, Bragg R, Dosumu A, Griffin M. Affective Outcomes of Group versus Lone Green Exercise Participation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(2):624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rogerson, Mike; Colbeck, Ian; Bragg, Rachel; Dosumu, Adekunle; Griffin, Murray. 2020. "Affective Outcomes of Group versus Lone Green Exercise Participation" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 2: 624. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020624

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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