Next Article in Journal
Piercing and Oral Health: A Study on the Knowledge of Risks and Complications
Previous Article in Journal
Straining at Work and Its Relationship with Personality Profiles and Individual Consequences in Healthcare Workers (HCWs)
Open AccessCommunication

Nasal Microbiota Modifies the Effects of Particulate Air Pollution on Plasma Extracellular Vesicles

1
EPIGET LAB, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20122 Milan, Italy
2
Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 20122 Milan, Italy
3
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, 22100 Como, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020611
Received: 19 December 2019 / Revised: 13 January 2020 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 17 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Air pollution exposure has been linked to modifications of both extracellular vesicle (EV) concentration and nasal microbiota structure (NMB), which might act as the respiratory health gatekeeper. This study aimed to assess whether an unbalanced NMB could modify the effect of particulate matter (PM) exposure on plasmatic EV levels. Due to two different NMB taxonomical profiles characterized by a widely different relative abundance of the Moraxella genus, the enrolled population was stratified into Mor− (balanced NMB) and Mor+ (unbalanced NMB) groups (Moraxella genus’s cut-off ≤25% and >25%, respectively). EV features were assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and flow-cytometry (FC). Multivariable analyses were applied on EV outcomes to evaluate a possible association between PM10 and PM2.5 and plasmatic EV levels. The Mor− group revealed positive associations between PM levels and plasmatic CD105+ EVs (GMR = 4.39 p = 0.02) as for total EV count (GMR = 1.92 p = 0.02). Conversely, the Mor+ group showed a negative association between exposure and EV outcomes (CD66+ GMR = 0.004 p = 0.01; EpCAM+ GMR = 0.005 p = 0.01). Our findings provide an insight regarding how a balanced NMB may help to counteract PM exposure effects in terms of plasmatic EV concentration. Further research is necessary to understand the relationship between the host and the NMB to disentangle the mechanism exerted by inhaled pollutants in modulating EVs and NMB. View Full-Text
Keywords: particulate matter; extracellular vesicles; nanoparticle tracking analysis; flow-cytometry; dysbiosis; bacteria; Moraxella; nasal microbiota; microbiome; 16S particulate matter; extracellular vesicles; nanoparticle tracking analysis; flow-cytometry; dysbiosis; bacteria; Moraxella; nasal microbiota; microbiome; 16S
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mariani, J.; Favero, C.; Carugno, M.; Pergoli, L.; Ferrari, L.; Bonzini, M.; Cattaneo, A.; Pesatori, A.C.; Bollati, V. Nasal Microbiota Modifies the Effects of Particulate Air Pollution on Plasma Extracellular Vesicles. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 611.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop