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Open AccessArticle

Seasonal Dynamics and Spatial Distribution of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Temperate Region in Europe, Southern Portugal

1
Centre for Vectors and Infectious Diseases Research/National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Avenida da Liberdade 5, 2965-575 Águas de Moura, Portugal
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Instituto de Saúde Ambiental, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, Ed. Egas Moniz, Piso0, Ala C, 1649-028 Lisboa, Portugal
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Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Lisbon, Rua Branca Edmée Marques, 1600-276 Lisboa, Portugal
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Department of Epidemiology/National Institute of Health Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Avenida Padre Cruz, 1649-019 Lisboa, Portugal
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NOVA Information Management School, Campus de Campolide, 1070-312 Lisboa, Portugal
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Department of Public Health and Planning, Algarve Regional Health Administration, IP, Rua Brites de Almeida, n° 6, 3rd Dt° 8000-234 Faro, Portugal
7
BioISI—Biosystems & Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7083; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197083
Received: 1 September 2020 / Revised: 21 September 2020 / Accepted: 24 September 2020 / Published: 27 September 2020
Aedes albopictus is an invasive mosquito that has colonized several European countries as well as Portugal, where it was detected for the first time in 2017. To increase the knowledge of Ae. albopictus population dynamics, a survey was carried out in the municipality of Loulé, Algarve, a Southern temperate region of Portugal, throughout 2019, with Biogents Sentinel traps (BGS traps) and ovitraps. More than 19,000 eggs and 400 adults were identified from May 9 (week 19) and December 16 (week 50). A positive correlation between the number of females captured in the BGS traps and the number of eggs collected in ovitraps was found. The start of activity of A. albopictus in May corresponded to an average minimum temperature above 13.0 °C and an average maximum temperature of 26.2 °C. The abundance peak of this A. albopictus population was identified from September to November. The positive effect of temperature on the seasonal activity of the adult population observed highlight the importance of climate change in affecting the occurrence, abundance, and distribution patterns of this species. The continuously monitoring activities currently ongoing point to an established population of A. albopictus in Loulé, Algarve, in a dispersion process to other regions of Portugal and raises concern for future outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases associated with this invasive mosquito species. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aedes albopictus; invasive mosquitoes; population dynamics; arboviruses; Portugal Aedes albopictus; invasive mosquitoes; population dynamics; arboviruses; Portugal
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Osório, H.C.; Rocha, J.; Roquette, R.; Guerreiro, N.M.; Zé-Zé, L.; Amaro, F.; Silva, M.; Alves, M.J. Seasonal Dynamics and Spatial Distribution of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Temperate Region in Europe, Southern Portugal. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7083.

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