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Open AccessArticle

Is Rescuer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Jeopardised by Previous Fatiguing Exercise?

1
Department of Physical Activity and Sport, Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Murcia, 30720 Murcia, Spain
2
Porto Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
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Centre of Research, Education, Innovation and Intervention in Sport, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 4200-450 Porto, Portugal
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Department of Physical Activity and Sport, Catholic University of San Antonio, 30107 Murcia, Spain
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Research Center for Sports, Exercise and Human Development, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
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University Institute of Maia, 4475-690 Maia, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6668; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186668
Received: 9 August 2020 / Revised: 2 September 2020 / Accepted: 11 September 2020 / Published: 13 September 2020
Survival outcomes increase significantly when cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is provided correctly, but rescuer’s fatigue can compromise CPR delivery. We investigated the effect of a 100-m maximal run on CPR and physiological variables in 14 emergency medical technicians (age 29.2 ± 5.8 years, height 171.2 ± 1.1 cm and weight 73.4 ± 13.1 kg). Using an adult manikin and a compression-ventilation ratio of 30:2, participants performed 4-min CPR after 4-min baseline conditions (CPR) and 4-min CPR after a 100-m maximal run carrying emergency material (CPR-run). Physiological variables were continuously measured during baseline and CPR conditions using a portable gas analyzer (K4b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy) and analyzed using two HD video cameras (Sony, HDR PJ30VE, Japan). Higher VO2 (14.4 ± 2.1 and 22.0 ± 2.5 mL·kg−1·min−1) and heart rate (123 ± 17 and 148 ± 17 bpm) were found for CPR-run. However, the compression rate was also higher during the CPR-run (373 ± 51 vs. 340 ± 49) and between every three complete cycles (81 ± 9 vs. 74 ± 14, 99 ± 14 vs. 90 ± 10, 99 ± 10 vs. 90 ± 10, and, 101 ± 15 vs. 94 ± 11, for cycle 3, 6, 9 and 12, respectively). Fatigue induced by the 100-m maximal run had a strong impact on physiological variables, but a mild impact on CPR emergency medical technicians’ performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: physiology; fatigue; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; oxygen uptake physiology; fatigue; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; oxygen uptake
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abraldes, J.A.; Fernandes, R.J.; Rodríguez, N.; Sousa, A. Is Rescuer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Jeopardised by Previous Fatiguing Exercise? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6668. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186668

AMA Style

Abraldes JA, Fernandes RJ, Rodríguez N, Sousa A. Is Rescuer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Jeopardised by Previous Fatiguing Exercise? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6668. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186668

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abraldes, J. A.; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Rodríguez, Núria; Sousa, Ana. 2020. "Is Rescuer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Jeopardised by Previous Fatiguing Exercise?" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 18: 6668. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186668

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