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Article

Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Confinement and Its Relationship with Meditation

1
Faculty of Psychology and Speech Therapy, Campus de Teatinos, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain
2
Departament of Evolutionary and Educational Psychology, Faculty of Science Education and Sport, University of Granada, Calle Santander, N° 1, 52071 Melilla, Spain
3
Departament of Psychology, University of Almeria, Carretera Sacramento, S/N, La Cañada de San Urbano, 04120 Almería, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6642; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186642
Received: 30 July 2020 / Revised: 2 September 2020 / Accepted: 9 September 2020 / Published: 11 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychological impact of confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, considering any protective factors, such as the practice of meditation or self-compassion, and their relationship with different lifestyles and circumstances of adults residing in Spain. A cross-sectional study was done using an anonymous online survey in which 412 participants filled out the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-2; the Impact of Events Scale; and the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, reporting severe symptomatology of posttraumatic stress and mild anxiety and depression. Quality of cohabitation and age were found to be key variables in the psychological impact of confinement. The impact of confinement was more negative for those who reported very poor cohabitation as opposed to very good (F (3, 405) = 30.75, p ≤ 0.001, d = 2.44, r = 0.054) or for those under 35 years of age compared to those over 46 (F (2, 409) = 5.14, p = 0.006, d = 0.36). Practicing meditation was not revealed as a protective factor, but self-compassion was related to better cohabitation during confinement (F (3, 403) = 11.83, p ≤ 0.001, d = 1.05). These results could be relevant in designing psychological interventions to improve coping and mental health in other situations similar to confinement. View Full-Text
Keywords: coronavirus; COVID-19; stress; anxiety; depression; mindfulness; mental health; Spain; psychological impact; confinement coronavirus; COVID-19; stress; anxiety; depression; mindfulness; mental health; Spain; psychological impact; confinement
MDPI and ACS Style

Jiménez, Ó.; Sánchez-Sánchez, L.C.; García-Montes, J.M. Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Confinement and Its Relationship with Meditation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6642. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186642

AMA Style

Jiménez Ó, Sánchez-Sánchez LC, García-Montes JM. Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Confinement and Its Relationship with Meditation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6642. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186642

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiménez, Óliver, Laura C. Sánchez-Sánchez, and José M. García-Montes. 2020. "Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Confinement and Its Relationship with Meditation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 18: 6642. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186642

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