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Open AccessArticle

Workload, Workaholism, and Job Performance: Uncovering Their Complex Relationship

1
Department of Psychology, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 81100 Caserta, Italy
2
Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
3
Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186536
Received: 7 August 2020 / Revised: 5 September 2020 / Accepted: 7 September 2020 / Published: 8 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancing Workaholism Research)
The current study aimed to test how workload, via workaholism, impacts job performance along with the complex interplay of perfectionistic concerns and work engagement in this mediated relationship. A two-wave, first and second stage dual-moderated mediation model was tested in an SEM framework. Results based on a sample of 208 workers revealed a complex and nuanced relationship among the studied constructs, such that the simple mediation model was not significant, but the indirect effect was negative, nonsignificant, or positive conditional on both moderators. The results offer interesting theoretical and practical implications for future studies to be conducted in this area of research. In particular, lower levels of perfectionistic concerns were associated with a positive relationship between workload and workaholism, and lower levels of work engagement were related to a negative link between workaholism and job performance. Findings suggest work engagement should be monitored and promoted by managers, especially when workload, and consequently, the possible risk of workaholism, cannot be avoided. View Full-Text
Keywords: workaholism; workload; perfectionism; work engagement; job performance workaholism; workload; perfectionism; work engagement; job performance
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Spagnoli, P.; Haynes, N.J.; Kovalchuk, L.S.; Clark, M.A.; Buono, C.; Balducci, C. Workload, Workaholism, and Job Performance: Uncovering Their Complex Relationship. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6536.

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