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Open AccessArticle

Needs, Aggravation, and Degree of Burnout in Informal Caregivers of Patients with Chronic Cardiovascular Disease

1
Department of Health Sciences, University of Opole, 68 Katowicka Street, 45-060 Opole, Poland
2
Medical and Diagnostic Centre (MDC), 08-100 Siedlce, Poland
3
Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of Białystok, 15-089 Białystok, Poland
4
Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Sciences, Pope John Paul II State School in Biala Podlaska, 21-500 Biała Podlaska, Poland
5
Family physician’s practice, Non-Public Healthcare Center, 58-350 Mieroszow, Poland
6
Department of Family Medicine, Wrocław Medical University, 1 Syrokomli Street, 51-141 Wrocław, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6427; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176427
Received: 17 August 2020 / Revised: 29 August 2020 / Accepted: 31 August 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
This study aimed to answer three main questions with respect to home caregivers for people with cardiovascular disease: (1) Are the needs of home caregivers being met (and at what level)?; (2) what is the level of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment of home caregivers?; (3) what sociodemographic variables of home caregivers are related to unmet needs and level of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment? The study used the Camberwell Modified Needs Assessment questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire. This study reports on 161 informal home caregivers of patients with cardiovascular disease. We found that younger caregivers were less likely to report unmet needs (p = 0.011), and showed lower rates of burnout on depersonalization and emotional exhaustion. In addition, caregivers who worked more often reported higher levels of met needs (p = 0.022), and showed lower rates of burnout on depersonalization (p = 0.005) and emotional exhaustion (p = 0.018). Subjects residing in urban areas were more likely to report unmet needs (p = 0.007), and showed higher rates of burnout on emotional exhaustion (p = 0.006). Older caregivers who are unemployed and reside in cities should be offered programs to determine their unmet needs and to receive support. View Full-Text
Keywords: informal caregivers; met and unmet needs; growing burnout informal caregivers; met and unmet needs; growing burnout
MDPI and ACS Style

Szlenk-Czyczerska, E.; Guzek, M.; Bielska, D.E.; Ławnik, A.; Polański, P.; Kurpas, D. Needs, Aggravation, and Degree of Burnout in Informal Caregivers of Patients with Chronic Cardiovascular Disease. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6427.

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