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Article

Self-Acceptance and Interdependence Promote Longevity: Evidence From a 20-year Prospective Cohort Study

1
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 259772, Singapore
2
Lloyds Register Foundation Institute for the Public Understanding of Risk, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117602, Singapore
3
Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
4
Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5980; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165980
Received: 1 August 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 13 August 2020 / Published: 18 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Health Care Sciences & Services)
We explored psychosocial pathways to longevity, specifically, the association between psychological well-being and mortality in a 20-year prospective cohort study of 7626 participants. As hypothesized, high self-acceptance and interdependence were associated with decreased mortality risk, controlling for other psychological components (purpose, positive relations, growth, mastery) and potential confounders: personality, depression, self-rated health, smoking status, body mass index (BMI), illness, and demographics. Self-acceptance decreased mortality risk by 19% and added three years of life. Longevity expectation fully mediated the relationship between self-acceptance and mortality. Interdependence decreased mortality risk by 17% and added two years of life. Serenity towards death fully mediated the relationship between interdependence and mortality. This is the first known study to investigate self-acceptance, interdependence, and serenity toward death as promoters of longevity, and distilled the relative contributions of these factors, controlling for covariates—all of which were measured over multiple time points. Theoretically, this study suggests that components of well-being may make meaningful contributions to longevity, and practically recommend that self-acceptance and interdependence could be added to interventions to promote aging health. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychological well-being; mortality; psychomics; mediation; preventive health; social gerontology; successful aging psychological well-being; mortality; psychomics; mediation; preventive health; social gerontology; successful aging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ng, R.; Allore, H.G.; Levy, B.R. Self-Acceptance and Interdependence Promote Longevity: Evidence From a 20-year Prospective Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5980. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165980

AMA Style

Ng R, Allore HG, Levy BR. Self-Acceptance and Interdependence Promote Longevity: Evidence From a 20-year Prospective Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(16):5980. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165980

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ng, Reuben, Heather G. Allore, and Becca R. Levy. 2020. "Self-Acceptance and Interdependence Promote Longevity: Evidence From a 20-year Prospective Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 16: 5980. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165980

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