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Article

Is Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation a Tool for Recovery after a Water Rescue? A Cross-Over Study with Lifeguards

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REMOSS Research Group, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, 36005 Pontevedra, Spain
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CLINURSID Network Research, Department of Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
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Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Physiotherapy, University of Vigo, 36005 Vigo, Spain
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Department of Physiotherapy, Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Universidade da Coruña, 15006 La Coruña, Spain
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Faculty of Sports Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, 3040-156 Coimbra, Portugal
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Research Unit for Sport and Physical Activity (CIDAF), 3040-156 Coimbra, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5854; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165854
Received: 15 June 2020 / Revised: 26 July 2020 / Accepted: 10 August 2020 / Published: 12 August 2020
This study aimed to evaluate the degree to which transcutaneous electrical stimulation (ES) enhanced recovery following a simulated water rescue. Twenty-six lifeguards participated in this study. The rescue consisted of swimming 100 m with fins and rescue-tube: 50 m swim approach and 50 m tow-in a simulated victim. Blood lactate clearance, rated perceived effort (RPE), and muscle contractile properties were evaluated at baseline, after the water rescue, and after ES or passive-recovery control condition (PR) protocol. Tensiomiography, RPE, and blood lactate basal levels indicated equivalence between both groups. There was no change in tensiomiography from pre to post-recovery and no difference between recovery protocols. Overall-RPE, legs-RPE and arms-RPE after ES (mean ± SD; 2.7 ± 1.53, 2.65 ± 1.66, and 2.30 ± 1.84, respectively) were moderately lower than after PR (3.57 ± 2.4, 3.71 ± 2.43, and 3.29 ± 1.79, respectively) (p = 0.016, p = 0.010, p = 0.028, respectively). There was a significantly lower blood lactate level after recovery in ES than in PR (mean ± SD; 4.77 ± 1.86 mmol·L−1 vs. 6.27 ± 3.69 mmol·L−1; p = 0.045). Low-frequency ES immediately after a water rescue is an effective recovery strategy to clear out blood lactate concentration. View Full-Text
Keywords: transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation; task performance and analysis; tensiomyography; lactate; lifesaving transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation; task performance and analysis; tensiomyography; lactate; lifesaving
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barcala-Furelos, R.; González-Represas, A.; Rey, E.; Martínez-Rodríguez, A.; Kalén, A.; Marques, O.; Rama, L. Is Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation a Tool for Recovery after a Water Rescue? A Cross-Over Study with Lifeguards. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5854. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165854

AMA Style

Barcala-Furelos R, González-Represas A, Rey E, Martínez-Rodríguez A, Kalén A, Marques O, Rama L. Is Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation a Tool for Recovery after a Water Rescue? A Cross-Over Study with Lifeguards. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(16):5854. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165854

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barcala-Furelos, Roberto, Alicia González-Represas, Ezequiel Rey, Alicia Martínez-Rodríguez, Anton Kalén, Olga Marques, and Luís Rama. 2020. "Is Low-Frequency Electrical Stimulation a Tool for Recovery after a Water Rescue? A Cross-Over Study with Lifeguards" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 16: 5854. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165854

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