Next Article in Journal
The Relationships between a Dietary Pattern Linked to Cardiometabolic Risk Factors and Life Satisfaction in Early Adolescence
Previous Article in Journal
Perinatal Mental Illness in the Middle East and North Africa Region—A Systematic Overview
Open AccessArticle

Explaining Racial Inequality in Food Security in Columbus, Ohio: A Blinder–Oaxaca Decomposition Analysis

1
Department of Geography, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
2
College of Social Work, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
3
Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity; Department of City and Regional Planning, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
4
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
5
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5488; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155488
Received: 10 June 2020 / Revised: 16 July 2020 / Accepted: 18 July 2020 / Published: 29 July 2020
Food insecurity is a leading public health challenge in the United States. In Columbus, Ohio, as in many American cities, there exists a great disparity between Black and White households in relation to food insecurity. This study investigates the degree to which this gap can be attributed to differences in food shopping behavior, neighborhood perception, and socioeconomic characteristics. A Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method is used to analyze a household survey dataset collected in 2014. We find a 34.2 percent point difference in food security between White and Black households. Variables related to food shopping behavior, neighborhood perception, and socioeconomic characteristics explain 13.8 percent, 11.6 percent, and 63.1 percent of the difference, respectively. These independent variables combined can explain 68.2 percent of the food security gap between White and Black households. Most of this is attributable to socioeconomic variables. Sense of friendship in neighborhood, use of private vehicles, and satisfaction of neighborhood food environment also partially contribute to the food security gap. View Full-Text
Keywords: food security; food insecurity; race; inequalities; Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition food security; food insecurity; race; inequalities; Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Koh, K.; Kaiser, M.L.; Sweeney, G.; Samadi, K.; Hyder, A. Explaining Racial Inequality in Food Security in Columbus, Ohio: A Blinder–Oaxaca Decomposition Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155488

AMA Style

Koh K, Kaiser ML, Sweeney G, Samadi K, Hyder A. Explaining Racial Inequality in Food Security in Columbus, Ohio: A Blinder–Oaxaca Decomposition Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(15):5488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155488

Chicago/Turabian Style

Koh, Keumseok; Kaiser, Michelle L.; Sweeney, Glennon; Samadi, Karima; Hyder, Ayaz. 2020. "Explaining Racial Inequality in Food Security in Columbus, Ohio: A Blinder–Oaxaca Decomposition Analysis" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 15: 5488. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155488

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop