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Article

Adapting Citizen Science to Improve Health in an Occupational Setting: Preliminary Results of a Qualitative Study

1
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Sustainable Productivity and Employability, The Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, TNO, 2316 ZL Leiden, The Netherlands
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Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Coronel Institute of Occupational Health, Netherlands Center for Occupational Diseases, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, 3721 MA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
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Faculty of Health, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, 1105 BD Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 4917; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144917
Received: 20 May 2020 / Revised: 30 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 July 2020 / Published: 8 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promotion of Healthy Work)
Health interventions often do not reach blue-collar workers. Citizen science engages target groups in the design and execution of health interventions, but has not yet been applied in an occupational setting. This preliminary study determines barriers and facilitators and feasible elements for citizen science to improve the health of blue-collar workers. The study was conducted in a terminal and construction company by performing semi-structured interviews and focus groups with employees, company management and experts. Interviews and focus groups were analyzed using thematic content analysis and the elements were pilot tested. Workers considered work pressure, work location and several personal factors as barriers for citizen science at the worksite, and (lack of) social support and (negative) social culture both as barriers and facilitators. Citizen science to improve health at the worksite may include three elements: (1) knowledge and skills, (2) social support and social culture, and (3) awareness about lifestyle behaviors. Strategies to implement these elements may be company specific. This study provides relevant indications on feasible elements and strategies for citizen science to improve health at the worksite. Further studies on the feasibility of citizen science in other settings, including a larger and more heterogeneous sample of blue-collar workers, are necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: blue-collar workers; worksite health promotion; unhealthy lifestyle; citizen science blue-collar workers; worksite health promotion; unhealthy lifestyle; citizen science
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MDPI and ACS Style

van den Berge, M.; Hulsegge, G.; van der Molen, H.F.; Proper, K.I.; Pasman, H.R.W.; den Broeder, L.; Tamminga, S.J.; Hulshof, C.T.J.; van der Beek, A.J. Adapting Citizen Science to Improve Health in an Occupational Setting: Preliminary Results of a Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4917. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144917

AMA Style

van den Berge M, Hulsegge G, van der Molen HF, Proper KI, Pasman HRW, den Broeder L, Tamminga SJ, Hulshof CTJ, van der Beek AJ. Adapting Citizen Science to Improve Health in an Occupational Setting: Preliminary Results of a Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(14):4917. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144917

Chicago/Turabian Style

van den Berge, Mandy, Gerben Hulsegge, Henk F. van der Molen, Karin I. Proper, H. R.W. Pasman, Lea den Broeder, Sietske J. Tamminga, Carel T.J. Hulshof, and Allard J. van der Beek 2020. "Adapting Citizen Science to Improve Health in an Occupational Setting: Preliminary Results of a Qualitative Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 14: 4917. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17144917

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