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Article

Post-Exercise Recovery of Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability after Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and Repeated Sprint Ability Test

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Physical Education Office, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan
2
Escola Superior Desporto e Lazer, Instituto Politécnico de Viana do Castelo, Rua Escola Industrial e Comercial de Nun’Álvares, 4900-347 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
3
Instituto de Telecomunicações, Delegação da Covilhã, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
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The Research Centre in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
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Department of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Taipei, Taipei 11153, Taiwan
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School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore 2480, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 4070; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114070
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 7 June 2020
This study aimed to examine the agreement and acceptance of ultra-short-term heart rate (HR) variability (HRVUST) measures during post-exercise recovery in college football players. Twenty-five male college football players (age: 19.80 ± 1.08 years) from the first division of national university championship voluntarily participated in the study. The participants completed both a repeated sprint ability test (RSA) and a Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIR1) in a randomized order and separated by 7 days. Electrocardiographic signals (ECG) were recorded in a supine position 10 min before and 30 min after the exercise protocols. The HR and HRV data were analyzed in the time segments of baseline 5~10 min (Baseline), post-exercise 0~5 min (Post 1), post-exercise 5~10 min (Post 2), and post-exercise 25~30 min (Post 3). The natural logarithm of the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN), root mean square of successive normal-to-normal interval differences (LnRMSSD), and LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio was compared in the 1st min HRVUST and 5-min criterion (HRVcriterion) of each time segment. The correlation of time-domain HRV variables to 5-min natural logarithm of low frequency power (LnLF) and high frequency power (LnHF), and LF:HF ratio were calculated. The results showed that the HRVUST of LnSDNN, LnRMSSD, and LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio showed trivial to small effect sizes (ES) (−0.00~0.49), very large and nearly perfect interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) (0.74~0.95), and relatively small values of bias (RSA: 0.01~−0.12; YYIR1: −0.01~−0.16) to the HRVcriterion in both exercise protocols. In addition, the HRVUST of LnLF, LnHF, and LnLF:LnHF showed trivial to small ES (−0.04~−0.54), small to large ICC (−0.02~0.68), and relatively small values of bias (RSA: −0.02~0.65; YYIR1: 0.03~−0.23) to the HRVcriterion in both exercise protocols. Lastly, the 1-min LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio was significantly correlated to the 5-min LnLF:LnHF ratio with moderate~high level (r = 0.43~0.72; p < 0.05) during 30-min post-exercise recovery. The post-exercise 1-min HRV assessment in LnSDNN, LnRMSSD, and LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio was acceptable and accurate in the RSA and YYIR1 tests, compared to the 5-min time segment of measurement. The moderate to high correlation coefficient of the HRVUST LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio to the HRVcriterion LnLF:LnHF ratio indicated the capacity to facilitate the post-exercise shortening duration of HRV measurement after maximal anaerobic or aerobic shuttle running. Using ultra-short-term record of LnSDNN:LnRMSSD ratio as a surrogate for standard measure of LnLF:LnHF ratio after short-term bouts of maximal intensity field-based shuttle running is warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: maximal intermittent exercise; post-exercise recovery; heart rate variability; autonomic nervous system maximal intermittent exercise; post-exercise recovery; heart rate variability; autonomic nervous system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hung, C.-H.; Clemente, F.M.; Bezerra, P.; Chiu, Y.-W.; Chien, C.-H.; Crowley-McHattan, Z.; Chen, Y.-S. Post-Exercise Recovery of Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability after Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and Repeated Sprint Ability Test. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4070. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114070

AMA Style

Hung C-H, Clemente FM, Bezerra P, Chiu Y-W, Chien C-H, Crowley-McHattan Z, Chen Y-S. Post-Exercise Recovery of Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability after Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and Repeated Sprint Ability Test. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(11):4070. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114070

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hung, Chin-Hwai, Filipe M. Clemente, Pedro Bezerra, Yi-Wen Chiu, Chia-Hua Chien, Zachary Crowley-McHattan, and Yung-Sheng Chen. 2020. "Post-Exercise Recovery of Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability after Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and Repeated Sprint Ability Test" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 11: 4070. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17114070

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