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Open AccessArticle

Parents’ Experience and Psychoeducation Needs When Supporting a Young Person Who Self-Harms

1
Orygen, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
2
Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
3
North Western Mental Health, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
4
School of Psychology, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
5
Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK
6
Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
7
Department of Psychological Medicine, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
8
Centre for Suicide Research, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
9
Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3662; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103662
Received: 12 April 2020 / Revised: 19 May 2020 / Accepted: 20 May 2020 / Published: 22 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
Background: Self-harm in young people can have a substantial negative impact on the well-being and functioning of parents and other carers. The “Coping with Self-Harm” booklet was originally developed in the UK as a resource for parents and carers of young people who self-harm, and an adaptation study of this resource was conducted in Australia. This paper presents qualitative analysis of interviews with parents about their experiences and psychoeducational needs when supporting a young person who engages in self harm. Methods: The qualitative study drew on semi-structured individual and group interviews with parents (n = 19 participants) of young people who self-harm. Data were analysed using Thematic Analysis. Results: The analysis identified six themes: (1) the discovery of self-harm, (2) challenges in the parent-young person relationship, (3) parents’ need to understand self-harm, (4) parents’ emotional reactions to self-harm, (5) the importance of self-care and help-seeking among parents, and (6) the need for psychoeducational resources. Conclusion: The study highlights the need for support for parents and carers of young people who engage in self-harm, including development and adaptation of resources, such as the “Coping with Self-Harm” booklet, of which an Australian version has now been developed. View Full-Text
Keywords: parents; carers; self-harm; young people; support; psychoeducation parents; carers; self-harm; young people; support; psychoeducation
MDPI and ACS Style

Krysinska, K.; Curtis, S.; Lamblin, M.; Stefanac, N.; Gibson, K.; Byrne, S.; Thorn, P.; Rice, S.M.; McRoberts, A.; Ferrey, A.; Perry, Y.; Lin, A.; Hetrick, S.; Hawton, K.; Robinson, J. Parents’ Experience and Psychoeducation Needs When Supporting a Young Person Who Self-Harms. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3662.

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