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Article

Cyberbullying and Psychological Well-being in Young Adolescence: The Potential Protective Mediation Effects of Social Support from Family, Friends, and Teachers

1
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, SE-701 82 Örebro, Sweden
2
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010045
Received: 30 November 2019 / Revised: 15 December 2019 / Accepted: 17 December 2019 / Published: 19 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cyber-Aggression among Adolescents and Psychological Wellbeing)
In the current study, we tested the relations between cyberbullying roles and several psychological well-being outcomes, as well as the potential mediation effect of perceived social support from family, friends, and teachers in school. This was investigated in a cross-sectional sample of 1707 young adolescents (47.5% girls, aged 10–13 years, self-reporting via a web questionnaire) attending community and private schools in a mid-sized municipality in Sweden. We concluded from our results that the Cyberbully-victim group has the highest levels of depressive symptoms, and the lowest of subjective well-being and family support. We also observed higher levels of anxiety symptoms in both the Cyber-victims and the Cyberbully-victims. Moreover, we conclude that some types of social support seem protective in the way that it mediates the relationship between cyberbullying and psychological well-being. More specifically, perceived social support from family and from teachers reduce the probability of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and higher levels of social support from the family increase the probability of higher levels of subjective well-being among youths being a victim of cyberbullying (i.e., cyber-victim) and being both a perpetrator and a victim of cyber bullying (i.e., cyberbully-victim). Potential implications for prevention strategies are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyberbullying; adolescents; cyber-victim; cyberbully-victim; mental health; psychological well-being; social support; depression; anxiety; subjective well-being cyberbullying; adolescents; cyber-victim; cyberbully-victim; mental health; psychological well-being; social support; depression; anxiety; subjective well-being
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hellfeldt, K.; López-Romero, L.; Andershed, H. Cyberbullying and Psychological Well-being in Young Adolescence: The Potential Protective Mediation Effects of Social Support from Family, Friends, and Teachers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 45. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010045

AMA Style

Hellfeldt K, López-Romero L, Andershed H. Cyberbullying and Psychological Well-being in Young Adolescence: The Potential Protective Mediation Effects of Social Support from Family, Friends, and Teachers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):45. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010045

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hellfeldt, Karin, Laura López-Romero, and Henrik Andershed. 2020. "Cyberbullying and Psychological Well-being in Young Adolescence: The Potential Protective Mediation Effects of Social Support from Family, Friends, and Teachers" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 1: 45. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010045

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