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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 933; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060933

Do Stand-Biased Desks in the Classroom Change School-Time Activity and Sedentary Behavior?

1
Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
2
Center for Aging and Translational Research, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
3
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 February 2019 / Revised: 11 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of stand-biased desks on the physical activity and sedentary behavior of third, fourth and sixth grade students across the school year. Methods: This within classroom crossover design study used teacher-determined allocation for seating within each classroom. Half of the students used a stand-biased desk and half used a sitting desk. Five-day hip-worn accelerometer assessments were completed at baseline and at the end of each nine-week intervention period. A mixed effects model was used to determine the differences in the percentage of time spent active and sedentary. Results: A total of 22, 36 and 41 students in 3rd, 4th and 6th grades, respectively, completed this study (57.1% male, 79.3% White). Regardless of the desk type, students became more sedentary (p < 0.001) and less active (p < 0.001) in the classroom as the school year progressed. After controlling for baseline activity, there was a significant interaction between the type of desk and time (p = 0.029). Students who spent a higher percentage of their classroom time sedentary engaged in less sedentary behavior when using a stand-biased desk compared to the traditional desk. Conclusion: The standing desk intervention was effective in mitigating the increase in sedentary behavior for those who started the school year more sedentary. View Full-Text
Keywords: actigraphy; children; control group; sedentary lifestyle; standing; intervention; school actigraphy; children; control group; sedentary lifestyle; standing; intervention; school
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Swartz, A.M.; Tokarek, N.R.; Lisdahl, K.; Maeda, H.; Strath, S.J.; Cho, C.C. Do Stand-Biased Desks in the Classroom Change School-Time Activity and Sedentary Behavior? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 933.

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