Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Further Education Students’ Attitudes Regarding Environmental Pollution. A Case Study in Granada
Next Article in Special Issue
The State of Public Health Lead Policies: Implications for Urban Health Inequities and Recommendations for Health Equity
Previous Article in Journal
Training and Body Composition during Preparation for a 48-Hour Ultra-Marathon Race: A Case Study of a Master Athlete
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mortality Characteristics of Two Populations in the Northern Mediterranean (Croatia) in the Period 1960–2012: An Ecological Study
Open AccessArticle

Neighborhood Tax Foreclosures, Educational Attainment, and Preterm Birth among Urban African American Women

1
College of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 904; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060904
Received: 23 January 2019 / Revised: 1 March 2019 / Accepted: 9 March 2019 / Published: 13 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Disparities in Urban Areas)
  |  
PDF [328 KB, uploaded 13 March 2019]

Abstract

Ecological evidence suggests that neighborhoods with more tax foreclosures also have more adverse birth outcomes. However, whether neighborhood-level tax foreclosures impact individual-level risk for adverse birth outcomes is unknown. We assessed whether living in a neighborhood with high tax foreclosures is associated with a woman’s preterm birth (PTB) risk and tested for effect modification by educational attainment, among urban African American women from the Life Influence on Fetal Environments Study (2009–2011; n = 686). We linked survey and medical record data to archival, block-group level tax foreclosure data from the county treasurer. We used Modified Poisson regression with robust error variance and included a foreclosure X education interaction in adjusted models. In the overall sample, neighborhood tax foreclosures did not predict PTB (adjusted relative risk: 0.93, CI: 0.74, 1.16), but the association was modified by educational attainment (interaction p = 0.01). Among women with lower education (n = 227), neighborhood tax foreclosures did not predict PTB risk. The association for women with higher education (n = 401) was statistically significant for a reduction in risk for PTB (adjusted relative risk: 0.74, CI: 0.55, 0.98) among those who lived in neighborhoods with high versus low tax foreclosures. Future studies should seek to identify the mechanisms of this association. View Full-Text
Keywords: preterm birth; neighborhood effects; tax foreclosures; urban decline; African American women; segregation; educational attainment preterm birth; neighborhood effects; tax foreclosures; urban decline; African American women; segregation; educational attainment
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sealy-Jefferson, S.; Misra, D.P. Neighborhood Tax Foreclosures, Educational Attainment, and Preterm Birth among Urban African American Women. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 904.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top