Next Article in Journal
The Global Financial Crisis and Overweight among Children of Single Parents: A Nationwide 10-Year Birth Cohort Study in Japan
Next Article in Special Issue
Utilization of a Mobile Dental Vehicle for Oral Healthcare in Rural Areas
Previous Article in Journal
Environmental Justice in Industrially Contaminated Sites. A Review of Scientific Evidence in the WHO European Region
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Living Environment and Thermal Behaviours of Older South Australians: A Multi-Focus Group Study
Article

The Best Day of the Week: New Technology Enhancing Quality of Life in a Care Home

1
Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, 2820 Gentofte, Denmark
2
The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
3
La Trobe University, Bundoora, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061000
Received: 13 February 2019 / Revised: 13 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
Older people living in residential aged care facilities tend to be physically as well as socially inactive, which leads to poorer health and reduced wellbeing. A lack of recognition of the importance of social support, limited resources, lack of training and task-oriented work routines leave little time for staff to meet the social needs of residents. Through qualitative ethnographic fieldwork, this study investigates the potential for new technologies to enhance quality of life and facilitate meaningful engagement in physical and social activities among culturally and linguistically diverse residents and staff in care facilities. A continuum from nonparticipation to full participation among residents was observed when Touch Screen Technology activities were implemented. Data indicate that resident’s engagement is impacted by five interdependent factors, including environmental, organisational, caregiver, patient, and management- &government-related. Findings show that new technologies can be used to increase meaningful physical and social engagement, including transcending language and cultural barriers. However, the successful application of new technologies to enhance quality of life is dependent on their integration into the daily routine and social relationships of staff and residents, with the full support of management. Guidelines governing the use of new technologies to support meaningful engagement of older people in residential care are lacking: this project highlights the importance of attention to the social relational dimensions of technology interventions to support best practice in their use. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential care; technology; social interaction; meaningful engagement; person-centred care; social ageing; social support residential care; technology; social interaction; meaningful engagement; person-centred care; social ageing; social support
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Juul, A.; Wilding, R.; Baldassar, L. The Best Day of the Week: New Technology Enhancing Quality of Life in a Care Home. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061000

AMA Style

Juul A, Wilding R, Baldassar L. The Best Day of the Week: New Technology Enhancing Quality of Life in a Care Home. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(6):1000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061000

Chicago/Turabian Style

Juul, Anne, Raelene Wilding, and Loretta Baldassar. 2019. "The Best Day of the Week: New Technology Enhancing Quality of Life in a Care Home" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 6: 1000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16061000

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop