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Article

Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Sedentary Behaviors in Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

1
Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8574, Japan
2
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan
3
Research Team for Promoting Independence and Mental Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan
4
Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8574, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4612; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234612
Received: 24 October 2019 / Revised: 14 November 2019 / Accepted: 16 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
No effective and easily implemented intervention strategies for reducing sedentary behavior have been established. This pilot trial (UMIN000024372) investigated whether vibrotactile feedback reduces sedentary behavior. Twenty-six adults aged 30–69 years who were sedentary ≥8 h/day were randomly assigned to control (n = 13) or vibration (n = 13) groups. Participants wore a monitor 9 h daily for seven-day periods at baseline (week zero), during the intervention (weeks one, three, five, and seven), and after the intervention (week eight). During the eight-week intervention, vibration-group participants were notified by a vibration through the monitor whenever continuous sedentary time reached ≥30 min; they also received weekly reports of their sedentary patterns. Control-group participants did not receive feedback. The primary outcome was change in total sedentary time. Changes in longer bouts of sedentary time (≥35 min) were also assessed. No significant difference was found in the change in total sedentary time (control: −17.5 min/9 h, vibration: −9.1 min/9 h; p = 0.42). Although no significant differences were observed in sedentary time in longer bouts, vibration-group participants exhibited significantly lower sedentary time (–21.6 min/9 h, p = 0.045). Thus, vibration feedback does not appear to offer any advantages in reducing total sedentary time. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behavior; vibrotactile feedback; objective monitoring sedentary behavior; vibrotactile feedback; objective monitoring
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nishimura, M.; Sasai, H.; Nakata, Y.; Maeda, S. Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Sedentary Behaviors in Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4612. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234612

AMA Style

Nishimura M, Sasai H, Nakata Y, Maeda S. Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Sedentary Behaviors in Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(23):4612. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234612

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nishimura, Makoto, Hiroyuki Sasai, Yoshio Nakata, and Seiji Maeda. 2019. "Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Sedentary Behaviors in Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 23: 4612. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234612

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