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Article

Heartburn-Related Internet Searches and Trends of Interest across Six Western Countries: A Four-Year Retrospective Analysis Using Google Ads Keyword Planner

1
Sanprobi Sp.z.o.o. Sp.K., 70-535 Szczecin, Poland
2
Faculty of Medicine I, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-780 Poznan, Poland
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Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 70-204 Szczecin, Poland
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Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 13353 Berlin, Germany
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Department of Gastroenterology, Pomeranian Medical University, 70-204 Szczecin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4591; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234591
Received: 26 October 2019 / Revised: 16 November 2019 / Accepted: 18 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of Healthcare: Telemedicine, Public eHealth, and Big Data)
The internet is becoming the main source of health-related information. We aimed to investigate data regarding heartburn-related searches made by Google users from Australia, Canada, Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We retrospectively analyzed data from Google Ads Keywords Planner. We extracted search volumes of keywords associated with “heartburn” for June 2015 to May 2019. The data were generated in the respective primary language. The number of searches per 1000 Google-user years was as follows: 177.4 (Australia), 178.1 (Canada), 123.8 (Germany), 199.7 (Poland), 152.5 (United Kingdom), and 194.5 (United States). The users were particularly interested in treatment (19.0 to 41.3%), diet (4.8 to 10.7%), symptoms (2.6 to 13.1%), and causes (3.7 to 10.0%). In all countries except Germany, the number of heartburn-related queries significantly increased over the analyzed period. For Canada, Germany, Poland, and the United Kingdom, query numbers were significantly lowest in summer; there was no significant seasonal trend for Australia and the United States. The number of heartburn-related queries has increased over the past four years, and a seasonal pattern may exist in certain regions. The trends in heartburn-related searches may reflect the scale of the complaint, and should be verified through future epidemiological studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Google; AdWords; heartburn; epidemiology; prevalence; United States; trends; Germany; gastroesophageal reflux disease; infodemiology Google; AdWords; heartburn; epidemiology; prevalence; United States; trends; Germany; gastroesophageal reflux disease; infodemiology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kamiński, M.; Łoniewski, I.; Misera, A.; Marlicz, W. Heartburn-Related Internet Searches and Trends of Interest across Six Western Countries: A Four-Year Retrospective Analysis Using Google Ads Keyword Planner. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234591

AMA Style

Kamiński M, Łoniewski I, Misera A, Marlicz W. Heartburn-Related Internet Searches and Trends of Interest across Six Western Countries: A Four-Year Retrospective Analysis Using Google Ads Keyword Planner. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(23):4591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234591

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kamiński, Mikołaj, Igor Łoniewski, Agata Misera, and Wojciech Marlicz. 2019. "Heartburn-Related Internet Searches and Trends of Interest across Six Western Countries: A Four-Year Retrospective Analysis Using Google Ads Keyword Planner" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 23: 4591. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234591

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