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Association between Use of Nutritional Labeling and the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components

1
Medical Courses, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
2
Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
3
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4486; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224486
Received: 9 September 2019 / Revised: 9 November 2019 / Accepted: 10 November 2019 / Published: 14 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
In this study, we looked into the association between the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and nutritional label awareness. This study used data from the Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (KNHANES) for the years 2007 to 2015. The study population consisted of a total of 41,667 Koreans of which 11,401 (27.4%) were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and 30,266 (72.6%) were not. Groups not using nutritional labeling had a 24% increase in odds risk (OR: 1.24, 95% CI 1.14–1.35) of MetS compared to groups using nutritional labeling. Use of nutritional labeling was associated with all components of MetS. Central obesity showed the highest increase in odds risk (OR: 1.23, 95% CI 1.13–1.35) and high blood pressure showed the lowest increase in odds risk (OR: 1.11, 95% CI 1.02–1.20). Subgroup analysis revealed that statistically significant factors were smoking status, drinking status and stress status. Groups that smoke, groups that do not drink and groups with high stress were more vulnerable to MetS when not using nutritional labeling. People not using food labels tends to develop metabolic syndromes more than people using foods labels. In the subgroup analysis, drinking status, smoking status and stress status were significant factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: metabolic syndrome; nutritional labeling; Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey; smoking; drinking; stress metabolic syndrome; nutritional labeling; Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey; smoking; drinking; stress
MDPI and ACS Style

Jin, H.-s.; Choi, E.-b.; Kim, M.; Oh, S.S.; Jang, S.-I. Association between Use of Nutritional Labeling and the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4486. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224486

AMA Style

Jin H-s, Choi E-b, Kim M, Oh SS, Jang S-I. Association between Use of Nutritional Labeling and the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(22):4486. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224486

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jin, Hyung-sub, Eun-bee Choi, Minseo Kim, Sarah Soyeon Oh, and Sung-In Jang. 2019. "Association between Use of Nutritional Labeling and the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 22: 4486. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224486

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