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Open AccessArticle

Indoor Air Quality Analysis of Newly Built Houses

1
Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, 6-2-1 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-0882, Japan
2
National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, 6-21-1 Nagao, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, 214-8585, Japan
3
Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8672, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4142; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214142
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 18 October 2019 / Accepted: 24 October 2019 / Published: 28 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Science and Engineering)
Recently, people have become increasingly aware of potential health issues related to indoor environments. In this study, we measure the concentrations of various volatile organic compounds, carbonyl compounds, and semi-volatile organic compounds, as well as the ventilation rates, in 49 new houses with light-gauge steel structures one week after completion. The proper indoor air quality of new residential environments can be ensured by characterizing people’s exposure to certain chemicals and assessing future risks. Our results show that the concentrations of the measured compounds were lower than the guideline values set by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan, and would continue to decrease. However, we observed that unregulated compounds, assumed to be substitutes for regulated solvents, contributed substantially to the total volatile organic compounds. To reduce indoor chemical exposure risks, the concentrations of these unregulated compounds should also be minimized. In addition, their sources need to be identified, and manufacture and use must be monitored. We believe it is important to select low-emission building materials for reducing residents’ exposure to indoor chemicals. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air quality; volatile organic compounds; total volatile organic compounds; newly built houses; sick building syndrome indoor air quality; volatile organic compounds; total volatile organic compounds; newly built houses; sick building syndrome
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Suzuki, N.; Nakaoka, H.; Hanazato, M.; Nakayama, Y.; Tsumura, K.; Takaya, K.; Todaka, E.; Mori, C. Indoor Air Quality Analysis of Newly Built Houses. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4142.

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