Next Article in Journal
A Pilot Intervention Using Gamification to Enhance Student Participation in Classroom Activity Breaks
Next Article in Special Issue
Leaving A Mark, An Animal-Assisted Intervention Programme for Children Who Have Been Exposed to Gender-Based Violence: A Pilot Study
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of School-Based Exergaming on Urban Children’s Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness: A Quasi-Experimental Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
The State of Animal-Assisted Interventions: Addressing the Contemporary Issues That Will Shape the Future
Open AccessArticle

Small Animal Veterinarians’ Perceptions, Experiences, and Views of Common Dog Breeds, Dog Aggression, and Breed-Specific Laws in the United States

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2
Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607, USA
3
Measham, 102 Bosworth Road, Measham, Swadlincote DE12 7Q, UK
4
Veterinary Information Network, 777 W Covell Blvd, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4081; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214081
Received: 23 September 2019 / Revised: 16 October 2019 / Accepted: 20 October 2019 / Published: 23 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Psycho-Social Impact of Human-Animal Interactions)
Dog aggression directed towards humans is a common and serious behavioral and public health issue. This cross-sectional study was designed to gain insights into U.S. small animal veterinarians’ views and experiences with the most common dog breeds in the U.S., dog aggression, and breed-specific legislation. An electronic survey was distributed via email to an online veterinary community, and responses were summarized and compared by means of χ2 and Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel tests. Most respondents were concerned about the risks of dog bite injuries, but the majority were not in favor of banning specific breeds of dogs in order to enhance public safety. When participants rated the perceived bite risk associated with popular dog breeds, Chow Chows were perceived as the highest risk, with pit bull types categorized as a moderate risk. Golden Retrievers were seen as the most appropriate for families with children. Public education about animal behavior was the most frequently endorsed policy intervention to increase public safety. These findings suggest that most veterinarians feel that banning an entire dog breed is not an effective way to ensure human safety. Instead, most respondents endorsed alternative initiatives, such as public education and stricter leash laws, to reduce the risk of dog bites. View Full-Text
Keywords: canine; bite; aggression; pit bull; breed; public health canine; bite; aggression; pit bull; breed; public health
MDPI and ACS Style

Kogan, L.R.; Schoenfeld-Tacher, R.M.; Hellyer, P.W.; Oxley, J.A.; Rishniw, M. Small Animal Veterinarians’ Perceptions, Experiences, and Views of Common Dog Breeds, Dog Aggression, and Breed-Specific Laws in the United States. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4081. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214081

AMA Style

Kogan LR, Schoenfeld-Tacher RM, Hellyer PW, Oxley JA, Rishniw M. Small Animal Veterinarians’ Perceptions, Experiences, and Views of Common Dog Breeds, Dog Aggression, and Breed-Specific Laws in the United States. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(21):4081. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214081

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kogan, Lori R.; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M.; Hellyer, Peter W.; Oxley, James A.; Rishniw, Mark. 2019. "Small Animal Veterinarians’ Perceptions, Experiences, and Views of Common Dog Breeds, Dog Aggression, and Breed-Specific Laws in the United States" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 21: 4081. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214081

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop