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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020215

Socioeconomic Status and Morbidity Rate Inequality in China: Based on NHSS and CHARLS Data

1
School of Economics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
2
School of Economics and Management, Beihang University, Beijing 100083, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 3 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
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Abstract

Previous studies have shown there are no consistent and robust associations between socioeconomic status and morbidity rates. This study focuses on the relationship between the socioeconomic status and the morbidity rates in China, which helps to add new evidence for the fragmentary relationship between socioeconomic status and morbidity rates. The National Health Services Survey (NHSS) and China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) data are used to examine whether the association holds in both all-age cohorts and in older only cohorts. Three morbidity outcomes (two-week incidence rate, the prevalence of chronic diseases, and the number of sick days per thousand people) and two socioeconomic status indicators (income and education) are mainly examined. The results indicate that there are quadratic relationships between income per capita and morbidities. This non-linear correlation is similar to the patterns in European countries. Meanwhile, there is no association between education years and the morbidity in China, i.e., either two-week incidence rate or prevalence rate of chronic diseases has no statistically significant relationship with the education level in China. View Full-Text
Keywords: socioeconomic Status; two-week incidence rate; number of sick days per thousand people; prevalence of chronic diseases socioeconomic Status; two-week incidence rate; number of sick days per thousand people; prevalence of chronic diseases
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Jiang, Y.; Zheng, H.; Zhao, T. Socioeconomic Status and Morbidity Rate Inequality in China: Based on NHSS and CHARLS Data. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 215.

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