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Review

Marginalisation, Ebola and Health for All: From Outbreak to Lessons Learned

1
Work Research Institute, Oslo Metropolitan University, PO. Box 4, St. Olavs Plass, NO-0130 Oslo, Norway
2
Law and Science and Technology Studies (LSTS), Free University of Brussels (VUB), 1050 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3023; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173023
Received: 22 July 2019 / Revised: 16 August 2019 / Accepted: 19 August 2019 / Published: 21 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health of Marginalized People)
The Ebola epidemic in West Africa between 2014 and 2015 was the deadliest since the discovery of the virus four decades ago. With the second-largest outbreak of Ebola virus disease currently raging in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, (DRC) it is clear that lessons from the past can be quickly forgotten—or be incomplete in the first instance. In this article, we seek to understand the health challenges facing marginalised people by elaborating on the multiple dimensions of marginalisation in the case of the West Africa Ebola epidemic. We trace and unpack modes of marginalisation, beginning with the “outbreak narrative” and its main components and go on to examine other framings, including the prioritisation of the present over the past, the positioning of ‘Us versus Them’; and the marginalisation—in responses to the outbreak—of traditional medicine, cultural practices and other practices around farming and hunting. Finally, we reflect on the ‘lessons learned’ framing, highlighting what is included and what is left out. In conclusion, we stress the need to acknowledge—and be responsive to—the ethical, normative framings of such marginalisation. View Full-Text
Keywords: marginalisation; Ebola outbreak; epidemic; crisis; West Africa; global health; lessons learned marginalisation; Ebola outbreak; epidemic; crisis; West Africa; global health; lessons learned
MDPI and ACS Style

Shelley-Egan, C.; Dratwa, J. Marginalisation, Ebola and Health for All: From Outbreak to Lessons Learned. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173023

AMA Style

Shelley-Egan C, Dratwa J. Marginalisation, Ebola and Health for All: From Outbreak to Lessons Learned. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(17):3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shelley-Egan, Clare, and Jim Dratwa. 2019. "Marginalisation, Ebola and Health for All: From Outbreak to Lessons Learned" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 17: 3023. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173023

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