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Open AccessReview

The Effect of Plyometric Training in Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review

1
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço and Research Nucleos of Polytechnic Institute of Maia (N2i), 4475-690 Maia, Portugal
2
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, Melgaço and Instituto de Telecomunicações, Delegação da Covilhã, 6200-001 Covilhã, Portugal
3
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, Melgaço, CIDESD—The Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Development, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
4
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Nikaia 18450, Greece
5
Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich 8091, Switzerland
6
Medbase St. Gallen Am Vadianplatz, St. Gallen 9001, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2960; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162960
Received: 8 July 2019 / Revised: 2 August 2019 / Accepted: 15 August 2019 / Published: 17 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health, Exercise and Sports Performance)
Volleyball is considered a very explosive and fast-paced sport in which plyometric training is widely used. Our purpose was to review the effects of plyometric training on volleyball players’ performance. A systematic search was conducted according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines using PubMed, SciELO, SPORTDiscus, Medline, Scopus, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and Web Science for articles published no later than December 2018. Any criteria were imposed for the included sample. The search focus was on interventional studies in which athletes underwent a plyometric program. To the 1831 articles found, another five were added, identified through other sources. Duplicated files were removed, titles and abstracts were screened, which left 21 remaining studies for extensive analysis. Results showed that the vertical jump (15 studies) was the major ability studied in plyometric training interventions, followed by strength (four studies), horizontal jump (four studies), flexibility (four studies) and agility/speed (three studies). In addition, it was observed that young (under 18 years old) female athletes were the most studied. The included studies indicated that plyometric training seems to increase vertical jump performance, strength, horizontal jump performance, flexibility and agility/speed in volleyball players. However, more studies are needed to better understand the benefits of plyometric training in volleyball players’ performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: plyometrics; performance; jump; strength; flexibility; agility plyometrics; performance; jump; strength; flexibility; agility
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MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, A.F.; Clemente, F.M.; Lima, R.; Nikolaidis, P.T.; Rosemann, T.; Knechtle, B. The Effect of Plyometric Training in Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2960. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162960

AMA Style

Silva AF, Clemente FM, Lima R, Nikolaidis PT, Rosemann T, Knechtle B. The Effect of Plyometric Training in Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(16):2960. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162960

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silva, Ana F.; Clemente, Filipe M.; Lima, Ricardo; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat. 2019. "The Effect of Plyometric Training in Volleyball Players: A Systematic Review" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 16: 2960. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162960

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