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Article

Does Cardiorespiratory Fitness Moderate the Association between Occupational Stress, Cardiovascular Risk, and Mental Health in Police Officers?

1
Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, University of Basel, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
2
Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2349; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132349
Received: 28 May 2019 / Revised: 27 June 2019 / Accepted: 29 June 2019 / Published: 3 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Occupational Safety and Health)
Background: Chronic exposure to occupational stress may lead to negative health consequences. Creating less stressful work environments and making employees physically and psychologically more resilient against stress are therefore two major public health concerns. This study examined whether cardiorespiratory fitness moderated the association between occupational stress, cardiovascular risk, and mental health. Methods: Stress was assessed via the Effort-Reward Imbalance and Job Demand-Control models in 201 police officers (36% women, Mage = 38.6 years). Higher levels of blood pressure, blood lipids, blood sugar, and unfavorable body composition were considered as cardiovascular risk factors. Burnout, insomnia and overall psychological distress were used as mental health indicators. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a submaximal bicycle test. Results: High cardiorespiratory fitness levels were associated with a reduced cardiometabolic risk, whereas high stress levels were associated with better mental health. Among participants who perceived a high Effort-Reward Imbalance, those with high fitness levels showed lower overall cardiovascular risk scores than their colleagues with low fitness levels. Conclusions: Work health programs for police officers should consider the early screening of burnout, sleep disturbances, and overall mental wellbeing. To increase cardiovascular health, including fitness tests in routine health checks and promoting physical activity to further increase cardiorespiratory fitness appears worthwhile. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiorespiratory fitness; cardiovascular health; psychosocial stress; police officers; mental health cardiorespiratory fitness; cardiovascular health; psychosocial stress; police officers; mental health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schilling, R.; Colledge, F.; Ludyga, S.; Pühse, U.; Brand, S.; Gerber, M. Does Cardiorespiratory Fitness Moderate the Association between Occupational Stress, Cardiovascular Risk, and Mental Health in Police Officers? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2349. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132349

AMA Style

Schilling R, Colledge F, Ludyga S, Pühse U, Brand S, Gerber M. Does Cardiorespiratory Fitness Moderate the Association between Occupational Stress, Cardiovascular Risk, and Mental Health in Police Officers? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(13):2349. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132349

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schilling, René, Flora Colledge, Sebastian Ludyga, Uwe Pühse, Serge Brand, and Markus Gerber. 2019. "Does Cardiorespiratory Fitness Moderate the Association between Occupational Stress, Cardiovascular Risk, and Mental Health in Police Officers?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 13: 2349. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132349

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