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Open AccessArticle

Exploring Generational Differences of British Ethnic Minorities in Smoking Behavior, Frequency of Alcohol Consumption, and Dietary Style

by Senhu Wang 1 and Shuanglong Li 2,*
1
Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge, 11-12 Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 IAG, UK
2
Department of Sociology, School of Public Administration, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122241
Received: 13 April 2019 / Revised: 8 June 2019 / Accepted: 21 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health of Marginalized People)
Background: This article explores ethnic minority generational differences in smoking behavior, frequency of alcohol consumption, and dietary style in Britain, and whether these differences can be explained by generational differences in socioeconomic status and ethnic identity. Method: Multivariate analyses using wave 2 (2010–2012) and wave 5 (2013–2015) of the United Kingdom Household Longitudinal Study on smoking behavior, frequency of alcohol consumption, and dietary style from 59,189 White British, 1690 Indians, 960 Pakistanis, 555 Bangladeshis, 1060 Black Caribbeans, and 1059 Black Africans, adjusted for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status and ethnic identity. Results: While we find little evidence for generational differences in dietary style, second-generation Indians, Pakistanis, and Black Caribbeans have a significantly higher probability of smoking than the first-generation, and all second-generation minorities are significantly more likely to consume alcohol than their first-generation counterparts. Such generational differences in alcohol consumption are partly explained by second-generation minorities’ weakened ethnic identity and higher socioeconomic status. Conclusions: This study facilitates a better understanding of minority generational differences in health behaviors and the role of socioeconomic status and ethnic identity, highlighting the need for future policy interventions to target certain second-generation ethnic minorities who have adopted certain host society unhealthy lifestyles. View Full-Text
Keywords: ethnic minority immigrants; migration generation; smoking; alcohol consumption; dietary style; health behavior; ethnic identity ethnic minority immigrants; migration generation; smoking; alcohol consumption; dietary style; health behavior; ethnic identity
MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, S.; Li, S. Exploring Generational Differences of British Ethnic Minorities in Smoking Behavior, Frequency of Alcohol Consumption, and Dietary Style. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2241.

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