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Can Engagement Go Awry and Lead to Burnout? The Moderating Role of the Perceived Motivational Climate

BI Norwegian Business School, 0442 Oslo, Norway
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 1979; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16111979
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 27 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 4 June 2019
In this study, we propose that when employees become too engaged, they may become burnt out due to resource depletion. We further suggest that this negative outcome is contingent upon the perceived motivational psychological climate (mastery and performance climates) at work. A two-wave field study of 1081 employees revealed an inverted U-shaped relationship between work engagement and burnout. This finding suggests that employees with too much work engagement may be exposed to a higher risk of burnout. Further, a performance climate, with its emphasis on social comparison, may enhance—and a mastery climate, which focuses on growth, cooperation and effort, may mitigate the likelihood that employees become cynical towards work—an important dimension of burnout. View Full-Text
Keywords: work engagement; burnout; mastery climate; performance climate; well-being work engagement; burnout; mastery climate; performance climate; well-being
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Nerstad, C.G.L.; Wong, S.I.; Richardsen, A.M. Can Engagement Go Awry and Lead to Burnout? The Moderating Role of the Perceived Motivational Climate. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1979.

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